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Nigerian prince scam took $110K from Wichita man; 10 years later, he’s getting it back

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A decade ago, Fred Haines was wandering the Wichita airport looking for a Nigerian man hauling two chests full of cash.
After an hour of waiting and asking around, he finally came to the realization that the $65 million Nigerian fortune he thought he was inheriting was not coming after all.
What is now coming, though, is the $110,000 he had been scammed out of, thanks to the work of the Kansas attorney general’s office.
From 2005 to 2008, swindlers hoodwinked Haines, a self-employed handyman in Wichita, into spending thousands in pursuit of an imaginary inheritance from a Nigerian government official — a con known as the Nigerian prince scam. Haines re-mortgaged his house three times in the process.

Last year, in a settlement with the Department of Justice, Western Union admitted it knew some of its employees had conspired with scam artists to bilk people out of money and had failed to fix the problem. The company set aside $586 million to create a fund to refund victims across the U.S. and Canada.
This was already unusual, said Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt, because once money is wired, it’s typically gone forever. Scammers are often overseas and obscure their identity.
The problem, however, is no comprehensive list of victims existed.
All victims who’d sent money to hucksters using the service were able to request refunds, but only those who had complained to law enforcement or Western Union were notified directly of the settlement.

As in other states, Schmidt’s office sent out news releases about the settlement, asking victims to contact the agencies. But he worried that not enough people would know, so his office took an extra step.
Schmidt’s office asked for a list from Western Union of all Kansans who’d sent large sums of money, or smaller sums to certain high-risk countries. They then sent more than 25,000 letters to everyone on that list to offer help in claiming refunds.
“It was an imperfect system, but it was the best we were able to come up with to try to identify people who otherwise never would’ve been identified,” Schmidt said.
Ironically, because many victims fell for scams of unsolicited offers of money, people were skeptical of the letters, Schmidt said. Some were even angry when employees called to follow up on those who hadn’t responded.
But this time it was for real.

When Haines, 77, first read his letter about the settlement, he felt cautiously optimistic.
“I thought, man, $580 million — yeah, I should be able to get a little bit of that.”
A lifetime habit of careful organization came to his rescue, he said, as he’d saved the correspondence with the scammers and every Western Union receipt. He sent the order numbers to the attorney general’s office, and each was confirmed. He filed and was granted a $65,000 refund.
Then, before the May 31 deadline for filing refund requests, Haines found another box of Western Union receipts and contacted the attorney general’s office.
And that’s how he got another $45,000 refund.
On June 4, the attorney general announced that his office had helped 344 victims claim a total of $1,758,988 in refunds. And that’s just the people who asked for their money back with the assistance of his office, Schmidt said.
The Nigerian prince scam, the one Haines fell for, has been around for so long that it has become a cliche, Schmidt said, “but the reason that scammers keep doing the same thing is that they’re making money at it.”
For Haines, it started with an email in his Yahoo inbox in 2005.
The scammers told him that his money moved from country to country, closer and closer to being his, but at each turn, he had to pay to overcome expensive obstacles.
“They started off with saying I was going to inherit $64 million, and right away I thought ‘This is kind of a joke, or it’s a scam,’” Haines said.
But he was intrigued, so they started talking.
“Those Nigerians know how to talk,” he said.
The scammer worked Haines over several days. He told him there were complicated laws governing the international transfer of large sums of money, that there were documents that had to be approved before he could have his fortune and finally that he needed thousands of dollars to move Haines’ money out of Nigeria.
That was the first payment, and over the years, they told him his money moved from Nigeria to Egypt to England back to Nigeria and even to New York.
He was sceptical at times — he tried to back out while his money was purportedly in Egypt, and they talked him back in — but he’d invested so much time, money and hope that as the days passed, it became more and more difficult to accept it had all been a lie.
“It got to the point where they were showing me that the president of Nigeria had sent me a letter. It had his picture on it and everything,” Haines said. “I looked it up on the computer to see what the Nigerian president looked like, and it was him.”
Once, he received an email claiming to be from Robert Mueller, who was then the FBI director. The email was addressed to Haines, code-name “B-DOG,” and it was signed with the FBI’s address and official seal.

A copy of the email that Fred Haines received, purportedly from then-FBI director Robert Mueller.
Ed McKinley Fred Haines

“I wish you can remove doubt and suspicious and go ahead I assured you that you will never regret this fund release,” the email said in part.
Eventually, the scammers grew so bold that they told Haines they were sending a courier with two chests full of cash to Wichita, and he was supposed to meet him at the airport.
Haines plans to use his reclaimed money to pay back debts incurred during the scam.
“Boy, if you get any information from Nigeria ignore it,” he warned.

 

Kansas

 

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Nigeria Steps Up Airport Security to Confront IS Terror Threats

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The Nigerian government intensified security at the country”s airports in the face of possible attacks by the Islamic State (IS), according to a document released today in the capital.

Although Africa is not one of the main focuses of the terrorist organization, more vigilance is needed in the airports to counteract a possible campaign of the group, warned an official memo published by Premiun Times digital newspaper.

The authorities of the continent’s most populous nation reported in recent months the entry of IS militants from Syria and Iraq, where the radical formation was defeated.

The document was prepared by the Office of the Government Secretary of the Federation and sent to the Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority, airports and the Nigerian Customs Service.

A few days ago, the British newspaper The Sun quoted a Nigerian air force official, according to which the IS could use flights between Lagos and London to attack the United Kingdom.

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Anambra Govt. begins revalidation of land title documents on June 25

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Anambra Government says it will soon carry out revalidation of title documents in some of the Government Layouts in the state.

The Commissioner for Lands, Mr Nnamdi Onukwuba, said on Monday that the revalidation was aimed at ascertaining the genuine plot owners and to determine the current status of every allottee.
“It is also to ensure that genuine plot owners receive the new digital Certificate of Occupancy (C of O) that will give their property `absolute legitimacy’.
“The ministry is, therefore, inviting all plot owners within the affected layouts to come forward with original copies of relevant documents, including proof of ownership for the revalidation.
“The exercise, by the Ministry of Lands, is scheduled to begin on June 25 to Aug. 13, 2018 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Mondays to Fridays),’’ Onukwuba said in a statement.
“The exercise will cover Onitsha GRA, Trans Nkisi (Phases I to III), Akpaka Layout, Harbour Industrial Layout, Fegge-Nupe Settlement, Niger Bridge Head, Niger Bridge Industrial Layout and Nkwelle Ezunaka Agric Lands.
“In Awka, the affected areas include Agu Awka, Iyi Agu, Ikenga and Ikenga Extension, Expressway Layout, Hill Top, New Town, Isiagu and Lockwood Layouts.
“Others are United Layout, Nkpor, Nkpukpa Layout, Obosi, Parcel D and Oba International Airport.
“The rest are Eme Court Layout Nnewi, Unity Layout Nnewi, Otolo-Utu Layout, Nnewi, Industrial Layout Ozubulu and Orifite-Nnewi-Ozubulu Layouts.’’
Onukwuba adds: “The revalidation will hold at two designated venues — Dolly Hills Hotels and Resort for those within the Onitsha axis — covering Trans Nkisi, Akpaka and GRA.
“Another centre will be located at the Ministry of Lands Headquarters, Awka, where designated staff will also attend to allotees in the Awka area.’’
He directed the allottees to come forward with two recent passport photographs, original copies and photocopies of the Certificate of Occupancy (C of O).
“They are also required to come with all payment receipts, including receipts for Ground Rents, valid identification, like National ID cards, valid Driver’s licences, International Passports or Permanent Voters Cards (PVCs).
“Other requirements are Sworn Affidavits and Police extracts, in case of loss of original documents.
“Any plot not revalidated within the period will be regarded as unallocated and shall be recovered by the Anambra State Ministry of Lands’’.

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Faure must go: How one Togolese woman is risking her life to end the 50-year Gnassingbé dynasty

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For Farida Nabourema, fighting for democracy in her country has come at a high price; she’s had to sacrifice her family, friends and her safety.
Nabourema has lived in exile from her childhood home of Togo for 10 years after speaking out against the regime of Faure Gnassingbé, whose family has ruled the West African nation for more than 50 years.

During the Gnassingbé dynasty, Togo became one of the world’s poorest countries and a place characterized by a crackdown on freedom of speech and dissent.
The US State Department recently raised deep concerns about rising levels of violence in the country and restrictions on free speech.
Nabourema had an early introduction to the regime’s brutal tactics when her father was arrested in 2003 for opposing the regime, she says.

Bemba Nabourema was a student activist in the 1970s calling for political change in the country.
Togo was then ruled by the current president’s father, Gnassingbé Eyadema, who came to power in a 1967 coup, seven years after the country’s independence from France.
“Every day during his rule people had to queue from the military camp, where he lived, to the presidential palace to clap for him in the morning, the afternoon, and the evening,” Nabourema says.

Nabourema recalls her father’s experiences at the hands of the elder Gnassingbe.
Her father was first arrested in 1977 for distributing pamphlets calling for political change.
“In 1985 my father was arrested again. He had electric cords wrapped on his genitalia and was tortured ’til he lost his voice. When he lost his voice, a soldier said ‘He is not screaming anymore probably because he was not feeling the pain anymore.’ So they started hitting him ’til they broke 13 of his ribs.”
He continued to have run-ins with the law.

In 2003, when Nabourema was 13, her father was arrested along with 28 others, for attending a meeting to discuss opposition to Gnassingbé.
He was released three days later but the message was clear. He was expected to live in silence under the shadow of an oppressive regime.

Faure Must Go

In 2005, Eyadema Gnassingbé died after ruling Togo for 38 years. Many Togolese were hopeful for change, but he was immediately succeeded by his son, Faure Gnassingbé, in what the African Union and rights groups called a coup.

“Even though I was 15 years old, the powerlessness in the face of injustice revolted me to the extreme,” Nabourema says.
She joined her father’s political party, Union of Force for Change, (UFC) and started attending opposition rallies.
Three years later, she left Togo to study in the United States, and in 2011 she co-founded the Faure Must Go movement that has since become a hallmark of the Togolese people’s struggle.
Her family members were immediately threatened by government loyalists and they became frightened for their safety.
“My siblings who I was living with at the time asked me to leave. I was 20 years old, in a foreign country but I pulled through and never allowed it to pull me down.”

Born ready for a revolution

Togo lies between Ghana and Benin on the west coast of Africa and around 60 percent of its population is under 25 and many of them have only known one ruler.

“I recall my sister telling me Togolese people are not ready for a revolution and I told her that no one is born ready for a revolution, we have to prepare them for it.”
Through social media, Nabourema started writing about the regime, denouncing what she considered violent atrocities and the continued injustice, and encouraging young Togolese people not to ever give up on freedom.
The government accused her of being a troublemaker.
“In 2014, I published the personal contact numbers for all members of Togo’s Parliament. I asked my compatriots to call the members and ask why they had voted against a bill to reinstate presidential term limits. I called the majority leader, who insulted me, then abruptly hung up the phone.
“I shared a recording of that call on social media and it soon went viral. A few days later, Parliament held a session in which they complained about not being able to sleep because they were harassed by hundreds of phone calls.”
“Of course, they retaliated with personal threats, intimidation and smear campaigns to depict me as a prostitute, a porn star, a fraudster. … The more they tried to destroy me, the more my followership grew, and the stronger I became,” she says.
A life on the run
Taking on the might of the regime has meant a life on the run for Nabourema, who now has limited contact with her family.
She says she has received numerous death threats and online abuse since starting her movement.
“The past two years, I move around every two to three weeks and sometimes even less,” she says.
“I usually pick countries that are not led by dictators.”

Nabourema says she usually shares information about a particular country after she has left it but she is extra careful in African countries.
“Police in Ghana once called me for questioning and told me: ‘We reserve the right to refuse you entry to our country if your political actions cause diplomatic tension between both nations.’
“No country wants to host an agitator. These were the words of the Accra regional police commander last August when they called me in for questioning. And I was questioned by nine officers,” she recalls. CNN is unable to independently verify this account.
“On some occasions, I have had to go to countries I know nothing about, where I know no one and can’t speak the language, but these are the places I feel safest, because… no one knows who I am.”
“However, there were times that I got very ill,” she adds. “These were the most challenging and depressing times, the fear that I would actually die a natural death while running away from potential assassins.”
One million strong
In 2016, Nabourema decided to return to Togo, but due to safety concerns, stayed in neighboring countries, only entering Togo when possible.
“When the Togolese authorities found out I was back, my parents who reside there received threats constantly. My father, being an activist himself, knew how to cope with it but my mom was not and used to blackmail me emotionally,” Nabourema says.
“So I decided to cut ties with her and have not spoken to her for the past two years. I still don’t have a relationship with my siblings, but I assume the farther away I stay from them, the safer they will feel.”
Despite the huge emotional toll, Nabourema remains steadfast, working with community organizers and political leaders.
A turning point came in August 2017, when Togolese opposition parties united to demand the reinstatement of the 1992 constitution that specified term limits on a president’s rule.
President Faure Gnassingbé refused, and Nabourema, along with thousands of others, began to call for his immediate resignation.
Protesters took to the streets nationwide and were swiftly met by a military crackdown.
“The regime, in typical fashion, retaliated by repressing the protests, shutting down the internet, arresting hundreds, shooting live bullets into crowds, and killing children as young as nine. But this time, we chose not to give up and the more they oppressed us, the more our numbers swelled until we reached one million people on the streets in 14 different cities in every corner of Togo in December 2017,” Nabourema says.

The people deserve better
The government did try to make some concessions in September, releasing prisoners and proposing a referendum on the reinstatement of the two-term limit for presidents. But the opposition boycotted the vote, fearing it would not apply retroactively to the current president and would allow him to run again in 2020.
Near weekly protests have continued but there has been little international outrage. The government has labeled the protesters as terrorists whose aim is to destabilize the region.
“We have no gold, we have no diamonds, or oil, and we have no coltan to bargain with. At times I feel exhausted and depressed by the continuous pressure, the waves of bad news about arrests of our activists, and the killing of our country’s children by security forces.”
But Nabourema won’t give up.
“When I look at all the sacrifices that were made for us to get this far, from my grandfather’s generation to my father’s and now to mine, I am filled with gratitude and hope. … Hope in a Togo where every citizen can aspire to become president without fear of retribution or death.
A Togo whose citizens have full say in the affairs and policies of their government and can hold them accountable.
“The Togolese people deserve better.”

 

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Nigeria Reaches Deal for Return of $500 Million of Stolen Funds

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Nigeria agreed a deal with some foreign countries for the return of $500 million in public funds stolen by officials, Justice Minister and Attorney General Abubakar Malami said.

Countries including the U.S., the U.K. and France are helping to repatriate the funds, Malami told reporters on Wednesday in the capital, Abuja. “We are almost concluding the processes,” he said.

Under terms agreed with the U.S., specific projects have been identified to which the funds will be committed when returned to the West African country, according to the minister.

A former Nigerian military ruler General Sani Abacha, who died in 1998, is alleged by the authorities to have siphoned more than $3 billion to foreign bank accounts, which are still being traced and returned to Nigeria.

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Presidential panel recovers $7m ‘stashed’ in Heritage Bank, others

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The Special Presidential Investigation Panel (SPIP) for the Recovery of Public Property has recovered seven dollars million (N2.1 billion at official rate) illegally kept in Heritage Bank.
Chairman of the panel, Mr Okoi Obono-Obla, disclosed this while briefing President Muhammadu Buhari on activities of the panel.
Spokesperson of the SPIP, Lucie-Ann Laha, made this known in a statement on Tuesday.
Laha quoted Obono-Obla as telling the president that the panel had also recovered N533 million and land worth N1.5 billion, all from the “previous management” of NEXIM Bank.

He said the recovered funds and property had since been returned to the bank.
Obono-Obla stated that the panel had also recovered and returned to the National Theatre, N24 million which was allegedly diverted by some directors of the agency.
Also recovered, he said, were two hectares of land in Abuja valued at over N2 billion, belonging to the National Council of Arts and Culture.
The chairman further told President Buhari that the panel also recovered and returned a part of Agura Hotel belonging to the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA).
He said the recovered part of the hotel had been illegally “annexed by some so-called powerful persons with untouchable connections for over 20 years’’.
Other recoveries by the SPIP, according to Obono-Obla, are 19 official Sports Utility Vehicles allegedly made away with by former Commissioners of the National Population Commission after their tenures in office.

He said the panel had charged a former Director in the Federal Ministry of Power, Works and Housing to court for failure to declare his assets.
The assets include houses in upscale areas of Abuja, a quarry and a farm within the Federal Capital Territory, for which a court has granted an interim forfeiture order, he said.
“The SPIP is also investigating some members of the National Assembly and former governors for a range of alleged offences.
“These include illegal purchase of designated official residences for principal officers of the National Assembly excluded from the monetisation policy at giveaway prices.
“Others are purchase of several property worth hundreds of millions in various currencies, and flagrant abuse of office thus causing financial adversity to the nation,” Obono-Obla said in the briefing.
He said the SPIP was partnering with the United Kingdom’s Home Secretary to ensure that some public officers “perceived to have looted public funds and illegally acquired assets both in Nigeria and the UK’’ were prevented from entering that country.
The SPIP chairman equally told Buhari that the panel was beaming its searchlight on several companies for a wide range of alleged offences.
Some of the companies, he said, are Celtel, for alleged tax evasion since 2005; Western Oil and Gas, for illegally drilling crude oil in Delta, and seven others for alleged failure to pay royalties to the Federal Government in about 10 years.
He said some multinational oil companies based in Egi Kingdom, Rivers, were also being investigated for allegedly conniving with unscrupulous individuals to dodge their obligations to the community to the tune of N38 billion and 30 million dollars.
“Also under investigation by the panel is another company, which has failed to to fulfill its contractual agreement to dredge the Calabar Channel, years after receiving $12 million.
“The panel has also compiled a list of over 200 past and serving public officers perceived to have illegally enriched themselves at the expense of the nation and the Nigerian people, among others,” Obono-Obla said in the briefing.
Buhari, according to the SPIP spokesperson, assured the panel of his continued support and non-interference in line with his administration’s stance on the anti-corruption fight.
Obono-Obla said the panel would remain committed to its mandate, in addition to complementing the Federal Government’s fight against corruption.
He solicited the continued support of Nigerians to the panel with useful information that would lead to the recovery of looted public assets.

The panel was inaugurated by the then Acting President Yemi Osinbajo in August, 2017.(NAN)

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Nigerian firm signs deal for sixth Damen 3307 Patrol Vessel

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Nigeria-based Homeland Integrated Offshore Services said it has signed a contract with Damen Shipyards Group for its sixth Damen 3307 Patrol Vessel.

The vessel will be another milestone collaboration between the companies, who have been in cooperation since Damen delivered Homeland’s first 3307 Patrol Vessel in 2014, said a statement from the company.

The vessel named, Guardian 6, will join its sister vessels in the Gulf of Guinea providing security services to oil majors operating in the region. It will perform roles such as deterring and intervening in piracy attacks, it said.

Additionally, it will carry out crew transfers and equipment deliveries. Homeland is approved and registered by the Government of Nigeria to provide private maritime security services, it added.

The Damen 3307 Patrol Vessel is based on Damen’s proven Fast Crew Suppler (FCS) 3307 and benefits from the design’s outstanding seakeeping behaviour, rapid acceleration and high top speed. Fitted out as standard, the vessel can carry up to sixteen military personnel along with their equipment, said a statement.

Homeland has selected a number of optional custom features for their vessel. This includes incorporation of a fast rescue craft, fuel trax electronic fuel monitoring system and a self-cleaning fuel separator.

Homeland’s chief executive officer Dr Louis Ekere said: “I’d like to thank Damen for the continued cooperation, which goes beyond the simple client-supplier relationship. We have a genuine collaboration that involves knowledge and technology sharing to the benefit of all parties.”

“The synergy has continued to grow the capacity of Nigerian indigenous companies in line with the objectives of the Nigerian Content Development Monitoring Board (NCDMD) of the Federal Government to grow the local content capacity and many people benefit from employment opportunities, both during the build and in the operation of this vessel,” he said.

Damen regional director Africa Harm Blaauw said: “Homeland is a very important client of ours in Nigeria, with a very well organised management structure.”

“We would like to express our sincere gratitude towards Homeland for the pleasant relationship over the past few years and we are looking forward to working together on a further expansion of the Homeland fleet and presence in the Nigerian maritime sector,” he added.

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WAEC Faults Obono-Obla’s Certificate.

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The West African examinations council (WAEC) has described as “altered and invalid” the results and certificate belonging to the chairman, special presidential investigative panel for the recovery of property, Okoi Obono-Obla, which was allegedly issued by the examination body.

Testifying before the house of representatives a-hoc panel investigating Obono-Obla’s alleged forgery, WAEC registrar, represented by the deputy registrar, Femi Ola told the committee that available evidence indicate that the results were altered and therefore makes them invalid.
The deputy registrar further explained that the genuine candidate is Ofem Okoi Ofem with certificate number 09403/247 of Mary Knoll college, Ogoja, cross river state. The exam number and number of subjects are the same. The difference is the grade in English literature in which Obla claimed to have scored c6 despite being marked absent in the true, certified copy.
The chairman of the investigative panel, Harman Pategi lauded WAEC for striving to maintain what he calls integrity and probity as he added that the implication is that Obono-Obla gained admission to the university of jos with a fake WAEC result.
The committee adjourned, promising to leave no stone unturned in doing what is right for the benefit of Nigerians.

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Muslim outrage over ‘This is Nigeria’ video

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A Muslim group in Nigeria is calling on musician Falz to withdraw his video for the single ‘This is Nigeria’ within seven days and apologise to Muslims.
“It is a hate video… It is an assault on the self-dignity of every Muslim,” said Ishaq Akintola, the head of the The Muslim Rights Concern (MURIC), in a statement.

‘This is America’ has been viewed more than 200 million times on YouTube

Falz’ video is inspired by the stark and powerful imagery of US rapper Childish Gambino’s ‘This is America’ clip, which launches a scathing and at times humorous attack on police violence, racism and gun crime in America.

‘This is Nigeria’ moves the concept to the West African nation. Falz lists the ills he sees in Nigeria, including those at the top of society benefitting from political and financial corruption while young people struggle to make a living.

MURIC said it objected to the presence of girls wearing hijabs doing the shaku shaku dance. Falz has defended the characters, saying they represent the abducted Chibok girls.
The group also criticised the use of a character at the start of the video who is “dressed like a Fulani man” and “suddenly abandons his traditional guitar and beheads a man”.
“The video manifests ethnic bias against Fulanis while it ignored the criminal activities of ethnic militia of the Middle Belt who have also massacred Fulanis and rustled their cattle in their thousands,” MURIC said.
The song also includes the lyric: “Fulani Herdsmen still they slaughter, carry people they massacre.”

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Nigerian government has failed in rice self-sufficiency

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An investigation carried out by Nigeria’s Premium Times has found that the ruling All Progressive Congress (APC) failed in its quest to make the country self-sufficient in rice production.
The Times reported on Monday that a joint investigation with Buharimeter into rice production in five states; Lagos, Ekiti, Kebbi, Kaduna and Ebonyi and in neighbouring Benin Republic found that the government’s flagship Anchor Borrowers’ Programme, which was touted as Nigeria’s answer to self sufficiency, had failed in most places.

It said the government was unable to recoup a large chunk of the N55 billion loan (nearly R2 billion) already disbursed.
Angry farmers claim the programme has been hijacked by local politicians who disburse funds to fake producers and has become a means of rewarding political patronage.

Attempts by the Rice Farmers Association of Nigeria to salvage the programme have stalled while complaints concerning expired herbicides, bad seeds and funding shortages threaten to further derail it.
APC boasted in March that agriculture was the core of Abuja’s economic policy, and President Muhammadu Buhari said he would invest heavily in the sector as a means of creating jobs in the hinterlands while also putting money into the local telecommunication infrastructure.

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182 inmates at large after Nigeria jail break: govt

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More than 180 inmates in a medium-security prison in central Nigeria were at large after unidentified gunmen opened fire on the facility, the government said on Monday.
The attack happened late on Sunday at the jail in the Tunga area of the Niger state capital, Minna. Guards were overpowered and inmates were able to escape.
“Out of the 210 inmates that escaped from prison custody, 28 have been re-arrested while 182 are still at large,” Nigeria’s interior minister Abdurrahman Dambazau told reporters.
“We have identified some lapses… part of it is that the prison personnel on duty yesterday were inadequate,” he said after touring the prison.

An investigation has begun but it was not immediately clear who or what was behind the incident.
Periodic jailbreaks occur in Nigeria’s congested and poorly maintained prisons, mostly aided by criminal gangs to free their comrades.
In November 2014 a group of gunmen armed with explosives blasted a prison in the town of Koton Karfe, in Kogi state, which neighbours Niger to the south: 132 inmates escaped.
In 2012 the same prison was raided by gunmen who freed more than 100 inmates. Boko Haram Islamists claimed responsibility and said its fighters were being kept in the facility.

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