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Lancaster University Ghana offers African students UK degree at their doorstep

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Ranked among the top ten universities in all the three major rankings in the United Kingdom, the University of Lancaster is one of the major educational destinations for foreign students studying in the UK.
Since the first set of students were admitted in 1964, the collegiate university has consistently strived to be among the best universities in the UK. This culminated in it being named among top 150 universities in the world and the 2018 University of the Year by The Times and Sunday Times.

In 2013, the university opened its first full-fledged campus in West Africa in Ghana. This campus allows students from across Africa to access Lancaster’s academic excellence in teaching and research on the African continent. For African students willing to be educated at Lancaster, the Ghana campus offers them that opportunities to have a UK degree at one-third of the price at their doorstep.

With the cost of acquiring travelling documents and moving to another continent eliminated, African students who choose to study in Ghana can do so knowing that the cost is not prohibitive. In addition, it offers scholarships, flexible payment plans and fee discounts, and there is a transfer opportunity to the UK campus, summer exchange programmes and internships.
The transfer can be done once the foundation year has been completed.
Moreover, students learn in a safe environment that is close to an airport, gyms, restaurants malls and recreational facilities.
The Ghana campus started with 67 students in 2013 and now has about 500. It also has an executive MBA programme.
Graduates from the school are automatically part of the thriving alumni network of over 100,000 alumni across 148 countries around the world.
Students are also supported to get employment or further studies. They are offered work placements, one-to-one support, as well as CV and interview skills training.

 

This article is a sponsored content brought to you by Lancaster University Ghana

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YOUNG FEMALE NIGERIANS WORKING TO CHANGE THE NARRATIVE OF THE GIRL CHILD.

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International Day of the Girl Child, which is also known as the International Day of the Girl and the Day of the Girl, was launched by the United Nations on October 11, 2012. Every year the day is observed to bring focus on gender inequality and creating more opportunities for girls. It aims to raise awareness about the challenges faced by girls across the world including domestic violence, discrimination, child marriage, Teenage pregnancies and lack of access to Education. Here in Nigeria a lot of events are being hosted today to celebrate the Girl Child and also to focus National attention on the plight of the girl child and how progress can be accelerated to empower her, one event worthy of note for today is a Conference put together by Hacey Health Initiative which is being dubbed ‘Nigeria’s largest conference on girls’
Today at IYAFP Nigeria, to commemorate the International Day of the Girl Child, we are going to be sharing 3 youth led initiatives that have been working tirelessly to improve the State of the Nigerian Girl Child. We hope these stories of our members would inspire you to take action in protecting, empowering and fulfilling the right of the Nigerian Girl Child.

African Development and Empowerment Foundation (AfricanDEF)

This organization was founded by Dr Victoria Adepoju, she is a proven advocate for girls and you women sexual and reproductive health and rights. AfricanDEF has reached over 11,000 youths mostly girls in remote areas and hard to reach groups with reproductive health information, family planning services, sexually transmitted infection treatment and counseling including HIV in both Oyo and Ogun State, Southwest Nigeria.

Strong Enough Girls Empowerment Initiative (SEGEI)

This initiative started by Onyinye Edeh has continued to positively impact the lives of young Nigerian girls with several projects. One interesting project is the monthly school outreach program. The team visits 4 schools at inner communities in Abuja and its environs one Thursday every month to talk to the girls about topics that directly affect them like Self Esteem, Decision Making, Abstinence, HIV and STDs, Love and Emotion, Finding Help, Gender etc. At these sessions, SEGEI team has successfully gained the trust of these girls who freely ask questions bothering them to which we provide answers based on the FLHE handbook. These visits they now look forward to, give them insight and their teachers have seen their confidence soar in the manner they participate in these sessions. A complete overhaul of the wrong information they had previously gathered from peers.

CENTRE FOR GIRLS EDUCATION (CGE)

Zainab Aminu Gurin is a program officer with the Centre for Girls Education (CGE), Zaria. Through her work with CGE, she have helped enroll and retain about 14,275 girls in schools at Northern Nigeria, also she has been able to empower girls in safe spaces by re-enforcing their core academic competence (literacy and Numeracy), life skills and access to adolescent sexual and reproductive health and rights information.
These are inspirational stories of young women who are working tirelessly to empower the girl child in Nigeria.
Here at the Nigeria Team International Youth Alliance for Family Planning ,we are an alliance of young people from different organization driven by the mission to improve young people access to sexual and reproductive health and rights education and services including Family Planning and empowering the girl child is one of our values as Gender is our agenda.

 


May we be able to smash the patriarchy and help young girls achieve their limitless dreams by breaking all barriers and stereotypes on their path

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World Teachers Day : Nigeria To Employ 250,000 Teachers

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Nigeria is set to employ 250,000 teachers between now and 2030 in line with United Nations recommendation.

It is also part of the strategy to engage enough teachers that would cope with the over thirteen million out-of-school-children in the country.
President Muhammadu Buhari in a message to the international teachers day celebration in Abuja announced this.

Unlike Faith Agwemuria, Adaramola Patrick has won the 2018 teacher of the year award, due to his childhood passion for the job.
Not many young people want to be teachers in Nigeria these days but, nine year old Yusuf Abubakar not only desires it, he wants to be an Agric teacher, just like the 2018 teacher of the year, who himself is an Agric teacher.
Unpaid salaries, poor working conditions are some challenges confronting the teacher in Nigeria, but the Nigerian government shows commitment not only to make the teacher more comfortable but to fill the gaps in shortage of teachers as identified by UNESCO.
United nations educational, scientific and cultural organization says globally, to reach out to 263 million out of school children, 69 million teachers need to be employed and out of thirteen million out-of- school children in nigeria, 250,000 teachers will be required before 2030.

For teachers like Angela Ajala, an education bank will support government’s investment in provision of quality teachers.
The theme of the 2018 teachers day is the right to education means the right to quality teachers.

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Nigeria’s Richest Woman Folorunsho Alakija Donates Skills Acquisition Center To School

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Nigeria’s richest woman Folorunsho Alakija has donated a Skills Acquisition Center to Yaba College of Technology, a higher educational institution located in Lagos.
According to a report by the Nation newspaper, the center is fully equipped with the necessary tools to be used in teaching skills in fashion designing, millinery (hat-making), bead-making, welding, pedicure and manicure, hair-dressing, barbing, soap-making, make-up artistry, shoe-making and fabrication.
At a ceremony on Wednesday where she handed over the new center to the school authorities, Alakija advised students to acquire a technical skill in addition to their academic degrees in order to increase their chances of financial success. She noted that technical colleges, vocational and skill acquisition centers could reduce unemployment significantly by creating a population of self-employed youths who will create cottage industries that can eventually snowball into big factories.

“We all can’t be in the office under air-conditioners executing white collar jobs. All those jobs are salary employment. You can be your own boss and build more confidence in yourself and put food on the tables of many more families as a result of the skills you have acquired,” she said.
Alakija, 67, is vice chair of Famfa Oil, a Nigerian oil exploration company with a stake in Agbami Oilfield, a prolific offshore asset. She is Nigeria’s richest woman with a fortune FORBES currently estimates at $1.8 billion.


Mfonobong Nsehe
Contributor

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Anambra and Homage to Education

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By C. Don Adinuba

The golden prize won by Regina Pacis Model Secondary School students in Onitsha, Anambra State, who participated in the $10,000 2018 Global Technovation Challange in which students from 115 countries participated on August 9 in California came to most Nigerians as a surprise. The school girls emerged victorious by designing an internet application to detect fake drugs, which has been a social scourge in the country and elsewhere. Nigerians were also surprised to learn of the bronze medal clinched by Tochukwu Anyigbo, a student of Lagoon Secondary School in Lagos, but sponsored by Governor Willie Obiano because she hails from Anambra State, in the International Robotics Competition held in Mexico a few days after the world competition in California. The prizes should not have surprised many Nigerians.

Anambra State has in the last few years been undergoing an unmistakable educational renaissance. In one of my most well received articles published in the mass media in January, 2016, entitled “Anambra: Leading the Return of Education and Enlightened Values”, I called national attention to the infectious enthusiasm which Gov Obiano, winner of the 1974 John Kennedy Memorial Essay Competition organized by the American Embassy in Lagos, has been demonstrating towards educational excellence. The immediate context was how Obiano invited to a meeting of the state Executive Council students of a public school who had just won the first prize in a Mock World Debate in South Korea as part of the preparation for the contest in Germany where they were also to do very well. He repeatedly called them heroes and heroines. The lads received rock star treatment which is reserved for mostly victorious football players in Nigeria.

Pius Okigbo, one of the most engaging economists and polyvalent intellectuals from modern Africa, must be feeling good in his grave at the turn of events in Anambra State. At the graduation lecture at the University of Lagos in 1992 entitled “Crisis in the Temple”, Okigbo showed with facts and figures that the intellectual tradition has been abandoned in Nigeria even by the universities. Higher institutions were no longer paying homage to knowledge but to mammon, as the rest of Nigerian society engaged in what Okigbo called calibration of our national life in pecuniary terms. He cited several examples of how our universities were falling over themselves to award honorary degrees to barely literate “men and women of power and money”, and not to persons of ideas or integrity.

Therefore, Okigbo must be satisfied, wherever he may be now, to see his state governor demonstrate reverence to knowledge rather than mammon, as the scripture calls money in a very derogatory manner. He must be proud that his home state has in recent times been excelling in various competitions. Loretto Special Science School at Adazi, Anaocha Local Government Area, for instance, last year won the first prize in the senior secondary school category of an intensive of assessment of schools throughout Nigeria while Queen of the Rosary Secondary School in Onitsha took the first position in the junior secondary school category. Ave Sancta Maria School, also in Onitsha, made the best result among primary schools, and Clement Okodo from Abagana in Njikoka Local Government Area was judged the best primary school teacher in Nigeria.

A teacher in another school in the state won the previous year the award of the Best Teacher in a nationwide competition sponsored by Nigerian Breweries plc. Olusegun Adeniyi, former presidential special adviser who now chairs Thisday editorial board and participated in the teacher’s award, told me in a private conversation that he found Anambra teachers very competitive in every area.

Anambra is the only state in Nigeria where teachers generally higher than civil servants. Science, English and Igbo teachers receive an additional 10% of their salaries because these subjects are considered key. Those who teach in hard-to-reach places like Anambra West Local Government Area which is a riparian place, are paid an additional 20%. In other words, a science or English or Igbo teacher in a hard-to-reach place earns not just his or her monthly salary like the counterpart in the civil service but an extra 40%.

The impression should not be given that Governor Obiano pays great attention to basic education but not higher education, for it will be misleading. He made it possible for medical students of the state university to graduate for the first time since they were admitted nine years earlier into medical school. They could not graduate because the medical school established by ex Governor Peter Obi failed get the accreditation from the Medical and Dental Registration Council of Nigeria which regulates medical education. It was starved of funds. It did not possess the right number and caliber of staff, the right equipment and other critical facilities. Obiano quickly provided the needed funds, with a directive to the authorities to get it accredited for training not just medical doctors but also specialists. Gynaecologists, paedetricians and other consultants are today trained there.

At Executive Council meetings, Obiano defers to professor members. In the middle of a debate, he often would say, “I rule in your favour because the professors are supporting you. You know I admire professors because of their knowledge”. No wonder, the two education commissioners, both incidentally female, are professors. Kate Omenugha, Commissioner for Basic Education, is the hardworking Nigeria’s second mass communication female professor and Theresa Nkechi Obiekezie, the young Commissioner for Higher Education, is a geophysics professor who in 2010 won the African Union-World Academy of Science National Young Scientist following a ground breaking research in life and earth sciences.

In consideration of Anambra’s prioritization of education, former World Bank vice president Oby Ezekwesili who is an ex Minister of Education, counselled the state government two years ago to take education from its list of economic enablers to its list of development pillars. Ezekwesili advised the governor to consider making the state Nigeria’s knowledge hub the way Massachusetts has become in the United States. California is another American knowledge centre. California would be the fifth or sixth largest economy in the world if it were a separate country. Its economy is driven by ICT and entertainment, and its excellent institutions like Stanford Business School are central to the development. The United Kingdom earns huge revenues from its excellent education. The University of Manchester prides itself on soft power because it has produced, more than any other British higher institution, more foreign heads of state, prime ministers and other leaders.

Any government, national or sub national, which places premium on knowledge is most likely to do well. Therefore, it is no surprise that Anambra State has been doing exceedingly well in various areas in the last few years. Just a month ago, Vice President Yemi Osinbajo, assisted by Health Minister Isaac Adewole, presented the first prize for excellent immunization campaign to the Anambra State government. Of course, the state remains Nigeria’s safest, and is increasingly recognized as the most peaceful and socially harmonious state in Nigeria. It has the best road network in the country and the rate of its agricultural and industrial development is very impressive. The only state to increase workers’ salaries in the past six years, Anambra always pays workers and pensioners before any other. These are, indeed, good times for the government and people of Anambra State.

It says a lot about Gov Obiano’s attitude towards education that a number of his commissioners and other senior officials have just returned from a leadership programme at Harvard. Another set will soon leave for the Lagos Business School. The significance of Obiano’s commitment to lifelong learning and development is the topic of another article. In the meantime, other states can borrow a leaf from Anambra which has proved to be truly the Light of the Nation.


Adinuba is Anambra State Commissioner for Information & Public Enlightenment.

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Education

NANS Bans Awards

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The National Association of Nigerian Students, NANS has banned all forms of awards and recognitions on behalf of the group until further notice.

President of NANS, Danielson Bamidele Akpan announced the ban in Abuja at the inauguration of new executives.
The NANS president, joined by other youths urged government to step-up funding for education and ensure entitlements of lecturers and teachers are not unnecessarily delayed leading to industrial action.

Ahead of the 2019 elections, the students’ body warned politicians against financial inducement of less privileged students in order to use them as thugs.
The students further called for peaceful coexistence and unity among Nigerians as the country goes into general elections.

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In Brief – Anambra Again : Good news from Adazi Nnukwu

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Anita Mary Charles, Loretto Adazi Student who won 1st Position in the just concluded MAN Mathematics Examination Senior Secondary Cathegory, in Anambra State enroute National Mathematical Center Abuja to represent the state at the National Level along side the Students from Tansi International college Awka (2nd Position) and Marist College Nteje (3rd Position). Hoping for a good outing as we expect d result. IT’S ALL ABOUT MISSION SCHOOLS.


Contributor :  Obijekwu Barth Ifediora

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NYU School Of Medicine grants free tuition to its students

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NEW YORK University’s School of Medicine announced on Thursday (Aug 16) that it is granting all of its students free tuition, regardless of merit or need, The New York Times reports.
The current 442 students attending will reportedly have the rest of their tuition paid in full through the medical program, and incoming students will receive their free tuition.
Citing the risk of “overwhelming” debt, it says every student will qualify regardless of merit or financial need.
NYU said financial worries were driving graduates to more lucrative specialities, pushing doctors away from more general positions.
“The scholarships will also be established, from here on out, to every future medical student at the school,” NYU stated in a press release.
Students must still however cover the cost of living expenses and accommodation.
The annual tuition was reportedly $55,018 and student debt by the time of graduation tallied at an average $191,000, according to a 2017 survey from the Association of American Medical Colleges.
Speaking to CNN, Rafael Rivera, NYU’s associate dean for admissions and financial aid said: “The debt can scare people away. One of those individuals could be the one to find a cure for cancer. For us, it’s important to have the best applicant pool possible, and society deserves nothing less.”

 

 

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Stormzy launches Cambridge scholarship for black students

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The Stormzy Scholarship will fund two black students to attend the prestigious university.

STORMZY is a true champion for black excellence.
The rapper recently announced the launch of a publishing imprint called Merky Books to help young writers become published authors and donated £9,000 to an Oxford student’s crowdfunder for her to go to Harvard in the US.
Now, the hitmaker is adding to that list of good deeds, after announcing that he will help fund two black British students to go to Cambridge University.
The Stormzy Scholarship will pay for tuition fees and provide a maintenance grant for up to four years of an undergraduate course.
The first two students will start their courses at the beginning of the new academic year this October with two further students selected for 2019 entry. This year’s entries will be self-funded by Stormzy however, he hopes to engage more support from additional investors to become part of the scheme.
Speaking to the BBC, the Cold MC said: “It’s so important for black students, especially, to be aware that it can 100% be an option to attend a university of this calibre. We’re a minority, the playing ground isn’t level for us and it’s vital that all potential students are given the same opportunity.”
He added: “There are so many young black kids all over the country who have the level of academic excellence to study at a university such as Cambridge – however we are still under represented at leading universities.
“I hope this scholarship serves as a small reminder that if young black students wish to study at one of the best universities in the world, then the opportunity is yours for the taking – and if funding is one of the barriers, then we can work towards breaking that barrier down.”
Stormzy announced the scheme at his old school, Harris Academy in Crystal Palace, south London on A-level results day.
The University of Cambridge’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stephen Toope, commented: “Stormzy is an inspiration, not just for his music but for his engagement on social issues and encouragement of young people. He has achieved great success in his career, but recognises that this was at the expense of his studies and the option of a place at a top university.
“He wants to inspire talented young black people who have their sights set on university to follow their dreams. The studentships are a beacon for black students who might otherwise have felt they could not come to Cambridge.”
Since announcing the Stormzy scholarship, fans on social media have praised the rapper for showing support to the youth.
Journalist Nadine White tweeted: “Stormzy has been making so many moves to enhance the lives of other people. #StormzyScholarship? I could cry. That’s beautiful.”Another Twitter user wrote: “Great to see #stormzy giving back to his community”
See more reactions below:

To be eligible for a 2018 entry ‘The Stormzy Scholarship’ applicants must be of black ethnicity and be holding an unconditional offer.
Applications must be submitted no later than Friday 31 August 2018.

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Education

Anambra School Girls Win Gold in World Technovation Challenge in US

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Anambra School Girls Win Gold in World Technovation Challenge in US

By James Eze (eziokwubundu@gmail.com)
The five Anambra girls from Regina Pacies Secondary School Onitsha who represented Nigeria and Africa at the World Technovation Challenge in the Silicon Valley in San Francisco, US last night have won the Gold Medal in the contest.
The team, led by Uchenna Onwuamaegbu Ugwu defeated representatives of other technological giants including the USA, Spain, Turkey, Uzbekistan and China to clinch the gold medal.
The Anambra girls who have now become Africa’s Golden Girls is made up of five brilliant girls including
1 Promise Nnalue
2 Jessica Osita
3 Nwabuaku Ossai
4 Adaeze Onuigbo
5 Vivian Okoye
The world champions who are reported to be attracting a lot of attention in the world’s greatest technological hub won the Challenge with a mobile application called the FD-Detector which they developed to help tackle the Challenge of fake pharmaceutical products in Nigeria.
Under the tutelage of Uchenna Onwuamaegbu-Ugwu the CEO of Edufun Technik STEM, the Golden Girls spent five months researching and developing FD-Detector which swept through over 2000 competing applications to get to the finals in San Francisco.
Technovation is a programme that offers girls around the world the opportunity to learn the programming skills they need to emerge as tech-entrepreneurs and leaders.
Every year, girls are invited to identify a problem in their communities, and then challenge them to solve them by developing Andriod applications that would address those problems.
115 countries participated in the qualifiers but only 12 teams from all over the world were selected as finalists for the pitch in Silicon Valley.
The girls will also be attending Field trips, life-changing workshops including a networking session during their one week stay in USA.
The Governor of Anambra State,Chief Willie Obiano had personally sent them off to the US in a brief ceremony at the last Executive Council Meeting where he charged the girls to put Nigeria and Africa on the global technological map with their rare talent.

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Sex education lessons from Mississippi and Nigeria

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Nigeria and Mississippi are a world apart physically, but the rural American state and the African country have much in common when it comes to the obstacles they had to overcome to implement sex education in their schools.
Three lessons about overcoming these obstacles come out of research that several colleagues and I conducted on how sex education came to be in Nigeria and Mississippi.
The lessons are particularly relevant for similarly religious and conservative places where people often worry – as they do throughout the world – that teaching young people about contraception and condoms will make them more likely to have sex. The lessons also come as the United States itself is embroiled in an ongoing controversy over whether to fund comprehensive sex education or emphasize the abstinence-only approach. More than half of states in the U.S. require that sex education stress abstinence. Comprehensive sex education in African and other developing countries is more the exception than the rule.

Sex education does not cause more sex

Although people often worry that sex education will lead to promiscuity, the evidence doesn’t support the notion that sex education makes young people more sexually active – at least not in the United States or in Africa.
Despite the fact that comprehensive sex education has been shown to protect adolescent health, it can be difficult to dispel fears that it will corrupt young people and reduce parental and religious authority. This is particularly so in socially conservative places.

Different approaches

Not all sex education is created equal. The gold standard from a health perspective is referred to as “comprehensive” sex education. The Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States defines this as “age-appropriate, medically accurate information on a broad set of topics related to sexuality including human development, relationships, decision making, abstinence, contraception and disease prevention.”
Comprehensive sex education has been shown to delay the age of the first sexual encounter, increase use of condoms and contraception, and reduce rates of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.
Comprehensive sex education is very different than abstinence-only education. Abstinence-only education, in best-case scenarios, teaches the same life skills but without reference to contraception. Most of the research on abstinence-only education finds it to be less effective than comprehensive sex education in delaying the first sexual encounter, increasing condom use or reducing the number of sexual partners.

Same problems, different places

Why compare experiences of sex education in a mid-sized U.S. state to those in the most populous country in Africa? It turns out Mississippi and Nigeria share some key similarities.
Mississippi is among the U.S. states with the highest teen pregnancy rates. In Nigeria, almost a quarter of women have begun childbearing by age 19.
Mississippi and Nigeria are also highly religious and rural. Both also have underfunded education and health systems. Despite these conditions, Nigeria mandated the teaching of sex education in 2001. However, implementation didn’t begin in earnest until 2011 with the support of a grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. By that time, the curriculum had shifted from comprehensive to abstinence-only. Mississippi required school districts to implement sex education by 2012 but under similarly restrictive conditions.
The jury is still out on the effects of sex education in Mississippi and Nigeria. However, some positive evidence exists for both places. For instance, in Mississippi, more than three-quarters of instructors surveyed in 2015 believed that sex education was promoting healthy relationships. And in four states in Nigeria, researchers concluded that the curriculum increased students’ confidence to refuse unwanted sex.
Three lessons about overcoming controversies around sex education emerged from my research in Nigeria and Mississippi.

Local organizations are crucial

First, strong, local organizations are necessary to promote sex education. In both places, homegrown organizations lobbied, connected people and provided legitimacy to the idea of teaching sex education. Crucially, these organizations were supported by funding from private donors or the federal government.
The Women’s Foundation of Mississippi funded and published a report showing the cost of teen pregnancy to taxpayers. The Center for Mississippi Health Policy supported a 2011 survey that showed parents overwhelmingly supported sex education. Mississippi First trains teachers on comprehensive sex education. It also helps channel funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to school districts that teach evidence-based sex education curricula.
In Nigeria, Action Health Incorporated led a coalition of NGOs, professional associations, donor organizations and federal ministries to form a task force. The task force helped write guidelines for sex education in 1996 that led to the adoption of curriculum in 2001. The Association for Reproductive and Family Health led the nationwide implementation of the curriculum with support from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

A cure for societal ills

Second, to promote sex education, these organizations presented sex education as a solution to social problems. In Mississippi, the problem was identified as the taxpayer cost of teen pregnancy. In Nigeria, it was the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
The Mississippi Economic Policy Center found in 2011 that the county-by-county cost of teen pregnancy to taxpayers was an estimated US$155 million in 2009. This cost was due to lost tax revenue, medical care, public assistance, foster care and other expenses. In Nigeria, data in the late 1990s indicated that 2 to 4 million Nigerians – approximately 5 percent of the adult population – were HIV positive. Many feared that Nigeria’s epidemic would come to resemble those in southern Africa. Sex education, which promised to reduce teen pregnancy and quell HIV transmission, served as a solution to these problems.

Compromise is necessary

Third, those promoting sex education were strategic. Proponents reached out to religious leaders, school officials and parents in order to allay their fears about teaching their kids about sex. And they made sure to stress that sex education was about health and life skills.
Still, in Mississippi and Nigeria, supporters had to compromise about the content of the curriculum. They agreed to change words and remove controversial sections. Consequently, in Mississippi, school districts can choose to teach abstinence-only curriculum. Condom demonstrations are not permitted, and the curriculum must be taught in gender-segregated classrooms. In Nigeria, the name of the curriculum was changed from the “National Comprehensive Sexuality Education Curriculum” to the more euphemistic “Family Life and HIV Education.” In addition, several more conservative states removed the words “sex” and “breast,” as well as images that show sexually transmitted infections.
While there is no universal way to ensure access to sex education, the experiences in Nigeria and Mississippi show that it can be done – even in places that are most resistant to the idea.

 

Rachel Sullivan Robinson
Associate Professor, American University School of International Service

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Can’t get on ANSSID?
If you have been having challenges getting your Anambra State Social Service number, here is what to do:
• send an email and ANSSID login details to: info@airs.an.gov.ng for immediate assistance.
• Visit the ANSSID HELPDESK or call HELPLINES: 07066727750 or 07033822851

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