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Cardinal Arinze: If Protestants want to receive Communion, they should become Catholic

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Cardinal Francis Arinze was baptised into the Catholic Church on November 1, 1941, his ninth birthday. He was a child eager to convert to Christianity from a traditional African religion, not because of the wishes of adults or others around him, but of his own volition and by the grace of God.
The man who received him into the faith was Blessed Cyprian Tansi, at the time a parish priest whose example of great holiness left an impression on the boy that has endured for a lifetime. This was the priest who, perhaps most significantly, helped to teach Arinze to recognise and love Our Lord present in the Eucharist.
“He was the first priest I ever knew,” recalls Cardinal Arinze, now 85. “He gave me the first sacraments – baptism, then penance and Holy Communion. He prepared me for Confirmation and I was his Mass-server in 1945.
“He was what you would like to see in a parish priest – zealous, sincere. When he celebrated Mass you saw that he believed what he was celebrating, so his life was attractive in itself. It was no surprise that wherever he worked there were many seminarians and women going into religious life.”
Among them was Arinze himself. He entered the All Hallows seminary of the Archdiocese of Onitsha at 15 and proved to be an outstanding student. He passed the Cambridge School Certificate in 1950, the year that Blessed Cyprian left Nigeria to join the Cistercians at Mount St Bernard in Leicestershire. In 1955 Arinze moved to Rome where he attained a doctorate in Sacred Theology summa cum laude from the Pontifical Urban University. He was ordained in 1958.
He attended the funeral of Blessed Cyprian in England in 1964, and has actively promoted his Cause for canonisation ever since, admitting that he fought to control his enthusiasm when it was first opened.
It was a year after Blessed Cyprian’s death that Fr Arinze became the youngest bishop in the world, when at the age of 32 he was consecrated as coadjutor of Onitsha. Within two years he succeeded as archbishop, becoming the first native African to lead the archdiocese, and in 1979 he became President of the Nigerian bishops’ conference.
Pope John Paul II elevated Arinze to the College of Cardinals in 1985 and in 2002 he was made Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.
His tenure as Prefect was a productive one, corresponding with the publication of Ecclesia de Eucharistia, John Paul II’s 2003 encyclical on the relationship of the Church to the Holy Eucharist, and with Sacramentum Caritatis, Benedict XVI’s 2007 exhortation on the Eucharist as the source and summit of the Church’s life and mission.
Given Cardinal Arinze’s credentials, he cannot be ignored when he chooses to speak about the sacraments. One such moment came recently at Buckfast Abbey in Devon, at a time when the German bishops had become so publicly divided over moves to allow Lutheran spouses of Catholics to receive Communion at Mass on Sundays that the Vatican was asked to intervene.
“What does the Church do that is as great as the Mass?” asked Cardinal Arinze. “The Church has only one possession equal to the Mass and that is another Mass. Nothing else.
“It is very important to look at the doctrine,” he added. “The Eucharistic celebration of the Mass is not an ecumenical service. It is not a gathering of those who believe in Christ and who invent a prayer for the occasion. It is a celebration of the mysteries of Christ who died for us on the Cross, who made bread into His body and wine into His blood and told the Apostles ‘do this in memory of me’.
“So the Eucharistic celebration of the Mass is the celebration of the faith community, those who believe in Christ. They are communicating in the faith, and in the sacraments, and in ecclesiastical communion, not now Holy Communion but ecclesiastical unity with their pastor, their bishop and the Pope. It is the community that celebrates the Holy Eucharist. Anybody who is not a member of that community does not fit in at all.
“It isn’t just that we wish one another well. After Mass, you can have a cup of tea and even a glass of beer and a bit of cake. That’s OK. But the Mass is not like that.
“But we wish other Christians well. The Holy Eucharist is not our private possession which we can share with our friends. Our tea is such and also our bottle of beer. We can share those with our friends.”
He said that if Protestants wished to receive Communion in Catholic churches they should become Catholics. “Come, be received into the Church and then you can receive Holy Communion seven times a week. Otherwise, no.”
Furthermore, Catholics who have committed mortal sins must receive absolution before they can receive the Eucharist, he said.
“If a person is not in a state of grace, even if he receives Holy Communion five times a day he doesn’t get grace at all but he commits five sacrileges because he wasn’t well prepared,” he says. “It means that the Holy Eucharist is for those in the Catholic faith and fold who hold on to that faith and who are well disposed. For the same reason you can see if a person is divorced and remarried then there is a problem. Christ said [that] he who drives away his wife or husband and marries another… Christ has one word: adultery. It is not we who made that. It is not a Vatican law. It is Christ who said it.
“We cannot be more merciful than Christ. If any of us says he has permission from Christ to change one of the major points Christ gave us in the Gospel we would like to see that permission and also the signature. You can see that it is not possible. Not even if all of the bishops agree, it doesn’t become so.”
Senior Vatican officials soon afterwards instructed the German bishops to withdraw their document on shared Communion, although the majority of them supported its publication.
But it wasn’t the end of the matter. Pope Francis later explained to reporters that the bishops had erred because canonically such matters must be decided at a local rather than national level, in a way achieved perhaps by One Bread, One Body, the 1998 norms of the bishops of England and Wales for shared communion between Catholic and Anglican spouses.
Within days the German bishops published the guide, saying they felt “obliged to stride forward in this matter courageously”.
Archbishop Hans-Josef Becker of Paderborn has said he would approve of Communion for Protestant spouses “in individual cases” after a period of discernment, while Bishop Franz Jung of Würzburg invited Lutheran spouses to receive the Eucharist during jubilee marriage Masses celebrated in his cathedral.
Whether this represents a shift in Eucharistic theology, as well ecumenical practice, will be a matter of debate for years to come.
But certainly change is in the wind and before too long it will, without doubt, descend upon English-speaking countries. This is perhaps evident in the statement by the Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission published this month on authority and ecclesial communion.
In one paragraph it expresses traditional Catholic teaching on the Eucharist, held with such conviction by figures like Cardinal Arinze, while in another it gently nudges open the door to novelty.
The Catholic Church might “fruitfully learn from the Anglican practice of provincial diversity and the associated recognition that on some matters different parts of the Communion can appropriately make different discernments influenced by cultural and contextual appropriateness”, the document declares.
Such innovations might well hold out the prospect of closer unity with other Christian communities, but they surely carry within them a counter-productive risk of grave division within the universal Church.
This would not only upset Cardinal Arinze and those like him, but would arguably be contrary to the unity for which Jesus Christ himself prayed.

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1 Comment

  1. Chibuzo E Onwuchekwa

    12th July 2018 at 9:57 pm

    Cardinal Arinze remains an Icon in the Catholic Church. It is amazing however how he conveniently forgets that Jesus Christ was NEVER a member of the Roman Catholic Church. There was nothing in the rituals of the Eucharist as was pronounced by Jesus Christ that referenced the Roman Catholic Church. To take a position that the Roman Catholic Church is the sole authority on the Eucharist remains stretching theology unnecessarily.

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Photonews : Representatives of the Family of the Late Chief (Dr) Alex Ekwueme, former Vice President of Nigeria, visit President Buhari

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PHOTOS: Representatives of the Family of the Late Chief (Dr) Alex Ekwueme, former Vice President of Nigeria, visited President Buhari at the State House yesterday. Delegation included Chief Laz Ekwueme, Prof. O. Ekwueme and Mrs Beatrice Ekwueme.

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President Buhari Mourns Coomassie

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President Muhammadu Buhari has commiserated with the family members, the government and people of Katsina state following the demise of his classmate and former Inspector-General of Police, Sardaunan Katsina, Ibrahim Ahmadu Coomassie.

The President in a statement said he received the news of the death of the Chairman of the Arewa Consultative Forum, ACF with shock and deep sense of loss.

He said his thoughts were with late Ibrahim Coomassie’s family and those mourning the demise of the late community leader and fine gentleman.

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Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala : Twitter appoints ex-Nigerian minister to its board

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NIGERIA’S former finance minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala has been appointed to the board of directors of Twitter.
Okonjo-Iweala shared the news on Twitter, saying she was “excited” to work on a platform that connects people and ideas.
“Excited to work with @Jack and an incredible team on the Board of Twitter, a global platform that is such a strong connector of people and ideas,” she wrote.

Okonjo-Iweala served under President Olusegun Obasanjo from 2003 to 2006 and President Goodluck Jonathan from 2011 to 2015.
With her new role, Twitter’s 10-member board now has three women, two of whom are black.
The social media company has been criticised in the past for its lack of diversity, joining the likes of many other Silicon Valley tech companies.
A report published in 2017 revealed less than 5 percent of all tech workers are African-American, and less than 11 percent are Hispanic and Latinos.
Double minorities face and even tougher glass ceiling in the tech industry, as only 25 percent of computing jobs are held by women — but a black woman in tech without a traditional education is unheard of.
Twitter has acknowledged it needs to improve diversity in its ranks and has ambitions to increase the percentage of female employees in the company to 43% by 2019 from 38% at the end of 2017. It has also committed to increase the percentage of black and Latino employees to 5%; both groups each represented 3.4% of Twitter’s staff at the end of 2017.

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NYCN elective congress: Nduanya calls for unity, canvasses support

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Comrade Innocent Nduanya, an aspirant to the seat of the President, National Youth Council of Nigeria (NYCN), has called for unity of purpose ahead of the elective congress on the council scheduled for Saturday, 21, July 2018 in Gombe.
Nduanya, in a statement on Friday in Abuja, assured delegates of his commitment to building a stronger and respectable NYCN if he elected president.
He said that the National Transition Committee led by the acting President of the council Comrade Mayor Enujeko and the Election Committee deserved commendations.
“I wish to welcome all the delegates to Gombe 2018 congress and pray for all others in transit a successful arrival.
“I implore all delegates and fellow aspirants to disregard all divisive information being spread which is capable of rubbishing all the efforts made so far on having a formidable NYCN.
“I also want to applaud the efforts of the supervisory ministry led by the Minister of Youths and Sports, Barr. Solomon Dalung and the Board of Trustees led by Amb. Dickson Akoh, for their determination toward having a successful congress,’’ he said.
Nduanya, who said his aspiration was divinely-led, reiterated his seven-point agenda as follows: reforming the activities of NYCN, promotion of peace and unity among Nigeria youths, campaign to foster youth participation in governance campaign to create more job opportunities for the youth.
Others are establishment of Youth Empowerment Trust Fund, establishment of National Youth Research Centre and Youth Leadership Institute and Nigeria Youth and International Exchange.
“I have a vision to make our dear youths to regain their glory and position. We all know that no Nation can stand without the youth,’’ he said

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FAAC: FG, states, LGs share N668.89b

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Federal, States and Local Government Councils have shared N668. 89 billion from the federation account as revenue generated in May.
The Director of Information, Federal Ministry of Finance, Mr Hassan Dodo, made this known in a statement on Friday in Abuja.
Dodo, however, said that the distribution of the funds did not signify the end of the dispute between the Federation Account Allocation Committee (FAAC) and some revenue generation agencies.
“Owing to disagreement on remittances by the Revenue Generating Agencies, especially the NNPC, the sharing of revenues for May 2018 that was meant to be distributed in June 2018 was put on hold.
“However, the urgent need to cushion the undue hardships being experienced by workers nationwide has made it necessary to distribute the May figures, totalling N668.898 billion to the three tiers of government.
“Efforts are being intensified to address the unsatisfactory remittances, ” he said.
Dodo said that the N668.89 billion shared was made up of statutory revenue of N575.47 billion and N 93.42 billion from Value Added Tax (VAT).
He said that the May revenue was shared in line with the extant formula as follows: Federal Government, N282.22 billion; State Governments, N181.16 billion; and Local Government Councils, N136.49 billion.
He said the oil producing states received additional N53.071 billion as 13 per cent derivation while N15.947 billion was paid to the revenue generating agencies as costs of collections.
The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that FAAC has been unable to share May revenue to the three tiers of government following rejection of NNPC remittances.
When FAAC meeting was held on June 27, representatives of the 36 states rejected the NNPC remittance for May, on the grounds that it was less than the projected revenue for the month.
Again, when the meeting reconvened on July 12, the state commissioners for finance insisted that a permanent solution must be explored to resolve the recurring issue around NNPC under-remittances to the federation account. (NAN)

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Nigerian children recount the challenges they face working in a city

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Stories of children being used in Nigerian mines have hit the headlines. But this phenomenon isn’t uncommon. About 15 million Nigerian children work –- the highest rate of working children in West Africa.
Globally there are over 168 million children, aged 5 to 14, that work. While most studies focus on child labour that happen in rural and agricultural areas, very few have reported the dangers experienced by children in urban areas of Africa where they work as street hawkers, hustlers, vendors and domestic servants.
But in a rapidly growing society such as Nigeria, where poverty is widespread, child labour in urban areas has become a systemic avenue for augmenting parental income. Though it may build the entrepreneurial skills of youngsters for later life, it can have detrimental consequences.
I set out to find out more about the lives of children who are working. Drawing on interviews with 1,535 children (aged 8 – 14 years) and their parents, my study documented their experiences. It showed that although child labour provides significant economic assistance towards the sustenance of the family, children don’t get a proper education and experience negative health and social consequences in the process.

Working children

Over half the children interviewed were female and the average age of all children was 12 years, though some were as young as 7-years-old. Most were engaged in sales (such as street hawking) and services (like car washing). While some of the children worked as much as six hours a day, the average daily hours of work was four.
When it came to the parents, more than two-thirds were engaged in trading and services, the remaining 28.4% were employed in administrative and professional occupations, indicating more education. Regarding parental income, an overwhelming 8 out of 10 parents earned about 20,000 Naira (about USD$55) per month. Such low earnings mean the households turned to using the labour of their children to supplement the family’s income.
Despite the economic benefits of child labour, the findings show that children face a variety of challenges in their daily activities.
More than a third had experienced accidents involving motor vehicles. “John,” a boy aged 9, complained that: “I get hit by car and motorcycles when I want to cross the roads.”
Surprisingly, 1 out of 7 children told our interviewers about attempted kidnapping. “Laide”, a 10 year-old-girl, narrated a scenario where two men wanted her to follow them by promising to give her 5,000 Naira (about USD$14).
The study also found that about 1 out of 10 children had been subjected to rape, sexual molestation, or assault while on the streets selling foodstuffs and fruits.
“Tayo”, a 13 year old girl said: “At times, some men would pretend that they want to buy things from me, but later would be touching my body.” “Kehinde”, a 14-year-old girl, said: “I was raped twice and became pregnant on one occasion by two men…My parents aborted the pregnancy so that it wouldn’t ruin my education.”
Because children spend considerable time away from their family and household, about one-quarter (22.8%) reported that gangsters would invite them to join in their bad activities. “Tolu”, an 11-year-old boy said: “Touts and gangsters would come to me and ask me to smoke Indian hemp (marijuana). Sometimes, they would ask me to describe my house so that they can come to visit me and invite me to join them in their activities.”
Almost one quarter (24.1%) of children miss one day or more of school each week. Moreover, 7 out of 10 of the working children attribute their poor school attendance to tiredness or sickness resulting from long distance walking due to their daily work activities, while the remaining 28% miss school because of their parents request that they should sell foodstuffs instead of attending school that day. This finding shows how child labour can have a detrimental effect on child health, which invariably affects their school attendance.
When children do go to school, about half are sometimes, or always, late. When asked why they’re late, 52.6% cited child labour as the major reason. Another one-third mentioned tiredness or illness as reasons for the lateness. Again, child labour appears to have a negative impact on their punctuality which does not bode well for effective learning and success in school.
Children were also asked about opportunities for doing homework after school. Just a little over 40% said that child labour does not hinder their time for homework.
Finally, interviews with the children reveal that two-thirds do not have time for recreation, although the remaining one-third manage to play with friends during the time they are engaged in child labour. Child labour disturbs children’s leisure time, hindering their optimal social development which they get through interacting with peers.

New policies

I recommend that policies need to be put in place that reduce the number of children working in Nigeria. Policy programmes such as credit facilities, poverty reduction schemes, by creating jobs for adults, and the provision of affordable medical facilities would improve the quality of lives and, consequently, reduce the need for child labour.
Existing laws should also be enforced, including compliance with the minimum working age and ensuring universal enrolment of Nigerian children in schools.

 

Prof. ‘Dimeji Togunde
Associate Provost for Global Education & Professor of International Studies, Spelman College

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Nigeria’s plan to redistribute recovered corruption money needs a rethink

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The Nigerian government has announced that USD$322 million (£244 million) stolen by Nigeria’s former military ruler, Sani Abacha, has been returned by the Swiss authorities. Abacha, an army general who was head of state from 1993 until his death in 1998, is suspected to have embezzled between USD$3 to 5 billion of public money.
Plans have also been announced to distribute the recovered loot to around 300,000 households in 19 of Nigeria’s 36 states. Under the plan each household would get around USD$14 a month. The handouts would be paid to poor Nigerians for about six years.
Roberto Balzaretti, one of the Swiss officials involved in the negotiations with Nigeria, reported that there would be strict conditions attached to the transfer of the money back to Nigeria. Nigeria has signed a memorandum of understanding with Switzerland and the World Bank agreeing the modalities for the return of the stolen funds.
The Nigerian government has opted for cash payments to be made to help poor families as part of the Nigeria National Social Safety Net Program. The money is to be paid in instalments and in small amounts under the supervision of the World Bank, which will also conduct regular audits. If the first instalment is not properly accounted for, subsequent payments will be halted. This is to prevent the funds from being stolen again.
But there are fears that this is not the best way to use the recovered funds and that the “distribution” is just a ruse to influence the Nigerian elections next year. Concerns have been raised that it’s an easy way for the ruling political party to score cheap points ahead of the 2019 polls. And there are strong views about how the money can be better spent, particularly on the country’s crumbling infrastructure.

Vote Buying?

The money is being returned to Nigeria at a delicate time. Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has announced that he will be seeking reelection next year. This despite his ill health and corruption scandals.
Nigerian politicians are infamous for buying votes.
Suspicions that the redistribution scheme is another vote buying ruse have been fuelled by the fact that the government plans to give money to only 19 states out of the 36. The government has said that 17 states where excluded from the scheme because they didn’t have the “appropriate platform” to implement the conditional cash transfers.
There are also fears that the recovered loot might end up in the coffers of ghost beneficiaries.
The Nigerian house of representatives – the lower house of Nigeria’s bicameral National Assembly – has passed a motion that the money must be distributed in line with the country’s revenue sharing formula for disbursing money to all 36 states.
The Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project, a Nigerian nongovernmental anti-corruption agency, has added its voice to criticisms of the plan. It has pointed out that the distribution of funds is mis-targeted and would not bring any tangible benefits to the beneficiaries.

The project argues that the president should renegotiate the memorandum of understanding with the Swiss authorities in consultation with the communities affected by grand corruption so that the recovered loot can be put to better use.

A better way?

Is there a better way to utilise the recovered loot?
Nigeria needs proper procedures to manage recovered money as it continues with its anti-corruption agenda. The government will be better placed in the future to manage recovered funds if it has a coherent plan detailing how they should be handled. The plan will need to be overseen by the country’s anti-corruption institution.
There’s a strong view that the recovered money should be used to foot the bill for infrastructure projects that would improve the lives of the victims of corruption and also help alleviate poverty.
Infrastructure projects, such as proper transport systems and power generation, also have the advantage of being highly visible and could be easily tracked through Budgit and Tracka. Construction projects would also create jobs.
There is a clear link between infrastructural development and economic growth – an area where Nigeria could really do with some help. The country struggles from infrastructure deficits, particularly in power generation, transport, education and health care.
Experts also argue that giving the money to poor households will only serve as temporary respite from poverty. Investing in infrastructure that can improve growth, employment, production, education and health care would create better and longer-term value.
The government might be wise to listen to these views.

 

Tolu Olarewaju
Lecturer in Economics, Staffordshire University

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Trevor Noah accused of racism for saying Africa won the cup

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THE DAILY SHOW host Trevor Noah has been accused of racism for saying Africa won the World Cup – because of the number of black players in the French national team.
During a segment of his show on Monday about France’s 4-2 victory against Croatia, Noah said” “Africa won the World Cup.”
“I get it, they have to say it’s the French team,” Noah said. “But look at those guys. You don’t get that tan by hanging out in the south of France, my friends.

“Basically if you don’t understand, France is Africans’ backup team. Once Senegal and Nigeria got knocked out, that’s who we root for.”
Noah’s remarks weren’t received well on social media, with some French natives noting that nearly every team member, regardless of their race, was born and raised in France.
French former reality TV star Martin Medus was among those who slammed the comments.
He said: ‘You’re a f****** racist. Those people are French and p***** to always be reminded of their background. They fight hard to tell people they are proud French people and yet you disrespect them calling them African. Are the Lakers an African team?’
Kevin Razy, a French comedian, criticised the South African host for regurgitating a racist joke that has circulated in France, while basketball player Evan Fournier said: “Stop it with this “Africa won the world cup for France” non sense. Is it Africa winning when the USA win Gold medals in the Olympics ? Is it Europe winning when South Africa win in Rugby ? And we can go on and on. Cut the BS. We are all french deal with it”

Of the 23-man squad, 16 have African roots with the exception of Hugo Lloris, Antoine Griezmann and Olivier Giroud are of European heritage.
France’s World Cup win has been described as a ‘victory for immigration’ and has posed questions as to whether the country’s approach to xenophobia, racism and discrimination will change following this win.
A tweet from Khaled Beydoun acknowledging this went viral. He said: Dear France, Congratulations on winning the #WorldCup. 80% of your team is African, cut out the racism and xenophobia. 50% of your team are Muslims, cut out the Islamophobia. Africans and Muslims delivered you a second World Cup, now deliver them justice.”

Political figures including Barack Obama and Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro seem to echo Noah’s sentiments in acknowledging the minority influence in the French national team.
“The French team looked like an African team, in fact it was Africa who won,” said Maduro. “France won thanks to African players or the sons of Africans.”
Maduro also congratulated France and called for an end to racism in Europe against African people.

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SENATE OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA ORDER PAPER Thursday, 19th July, 2018

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8TH NATIONAL ASSEMBLY 38 FOURTH SESSION NO. 13

SENATE OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA ORDER PAPER
Thursday, 19th July, 2018

1. Prayers 2. Approval of the Votes and Proceedings 3. Oaths 4. Announcements (if any) 5. Petitions

PRESENTATION OF REPORTS

1. Conference Committee Report Federal Audit Service Commission Bill, 2018 (HB. 107) Sen. Matthew A. Urhoghide (Edo South) -That the Senate do receive the report of the Committee on Public Accounts on the Federal Audit Service Commission Bill, 2018 (HB. 107) – To be Laid.

2. Report of the Ad-hoc Committee on Promissory Note Programme Promissory Note Programme and a Bond Issuance to settle Inherited Local Debts and Contractual Obligations Sen. Francis Alimikhena (Edo North) -That the Senate do receive the report of the Ad-hoc Committee on Promissory Note Programme on the Promissory Note Programme and a Bond Issuance to settle Inherited Local Debts and Contractual Obligations on refund to States Government for Projects executed on behalf of the Federal Government – To be Laid.

ORDERS OF THE DAY EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATION

1. Confirmation of Nomination. Sen. Ahmad Lawan (Yobe North-Senate Leader) -That the Senate do consider the Request of Mr. President C-n-C on the Confirmation of the Nomination of the following persons for Appointment as Chairman and Commissioners for the Federal Civil Service Commission in accordance with the provisions of Section 154(1) of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999 (As amended). S/N Name Position State New/Renewal of Appointment 1. Dr. Bello Tukur lngawa, OON, mni Chairman Katsina New Appointment 2. Moses Musa Ngbale Commissioner Adamawa New Appointment 3. Waziri Umara Ngurno, mni Commissioner Borno New Appointment 4. Alh. Bello Mahmoud Babura Commissioner Jigawa New Appointment 5. Arch. Ahmed M. Sarna (fnia) Commissioner Kebbi New Appointment 6. Princess Iyabode Odulate-Yusuf Commissioner Ogun New Appointment 7. Shehu Umar Danyaya Commissioner Niger New Appointment 8. Fatai Newton Adebayo O. MFR,FNSE Commissioner Oyo New Appointment
39 Thursday, 19th July, 2018 13

9. Chief Ejoh Michael Chukwuemeka Commissioner Anambra New Appointment 10. Joe Philip Poroma Commissioner Rivers New Appointment 11. Alhaji Ibrahim Mohammed Commissioner Kaduna Renewal of Appointment 12. Prof. Aminu Dio Sheidu Commissioner Kogi Renewal of Appointment 13. Mr. Simon Etim Commissioner Akwa Ibom Renewal of Appointment

CONSIDERATION OF REPORTS

1. Report of the Committee on National Identity Card and National Population Commission Screening of Twenty Three (23) Nominees for Confirmation of Appointment as Commissioners Sen. Suleiman O. Hunkuyi (Kaduna North) -That the Senate do consider the report of the Committee on National Identity Card and National Population Commission on the Screening of Twenty Three (23) Nominees for Confirmation of Appointment as Commissioners for National Population Commission. S/N NOMINEES STATE OF ORIGIN 1. Nwanne Johnny Nwabusi Abia 2. Dr. Clifford T. O. Zirra Ondo 3. Dr. Chidi Christopher Ezeoke mni Anambra 4. Barr. Isa Audu Buratai Borno 5. Sir Richard Odibo Delta 6. Okereke Darlington Onuabuchi Ebonyi 7. Mr. A. d. Olusegun Aiyejina Edo 8. Ajike Ezeh Enugu 9. Hon. Abubakar Mohammed Danburam Gombe 10. Prof. Uba S. F. Nnabue Imo 11. Suleiman Ismaila Lawal Kano 12. Prof. Jimoh Habibat Isah Kogi 13. Nasir Isa Kwarra Nasarawa 14. Barr. Aliyu Datti Niger 15. Yeye (Mrs.) Seyi Adereinokun Olusanya Ogun 16. Prince (Dr.) Olanadiran Garvey Iyantan Ondo 17. Senator Mudasiru Oyetunde Hussain Osun 18. Mrs. Cecilia Arsun Dapoet Plateau 19. Dr. Ipalibo Macdonald Harry Rivers 20. Sale S. Saany Taraba 21. Charles I. Ogwa (Rtd) Cross River 22. Dr. Sa’adu Ayinla Alanamu Kwara 23. Dr. Abdulmalik Mohammed Kaduna

2. Report of the Committee on Special Duties National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons Bill, 2018 (SB. 335) Sen. Abdul Aziz M. Nyako (Adamawa Central) -That the Senate do consider the report of the Committee on Special Duties on the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons Bill, 2018 (SB. 335).
13 Thursday, 19th July, 2018 40 3. Report of the Committee on Communications Nigeria Postal Services Act Cap N127 LFN 2004 (Repeal and Re-enactment) Bill, 2018 (SB. 106 & 437) Sen. Gilbert Nnaji (Enugu East) -That the Senate do consider the report of the Committee on Communications on the Nigeria Postal Services Act Cap N127 LFN 2004 (Repeal and Re-enactment) Bill, 2018 (SB. 106 & 437).

4. Report of the Committee on Information and National Orientation Agency for National Ethics and Values (Est, etc) Bill, 2018 (HB. 519) Sen. Suleiman Adokwe (Nasarawa South) -That the Senate do consider the report of the Committee on Information and National Orientation on the Agency for National Ethics and Values (Est, etc) Bill, 2018 (HB. 519). 5. Report of the Committee on Judiciary, Human Rights & Legal Matters National Commission for Peace, Reconciliation and Mediation Bill, 2018 (SB. 74) Sen. David Umaru (Niger East) -That the Senate do consider the report of the Committee on Judiciary, Human Rights & Legal Matters on the National Commission for Peace, Reconciliation and Mediation Bill, 2018 (SB. 74).

6. Report of the Committee on Environment National Oil Spill Detection and Response Agency Act 2006 (Amendment) Bill, 2018 (SB. 557) Sen. Oluremi Tinubu (Lagos Central) -That the Senate do consider the report of the Committee on Environment on the National Oil Spill Detection and Response Agency Act 2006 (Amendment) Bill, 2018 (SB. 557).

COMMITTEE MEETINGS

No. Committee Date Time Venue

1. Ad-Hoc Committee on Thursday, 19th July, 2018 1.00pm Committee Room 204 Alleged Mis-use, Under- (Public Hearing) Senate New Building Remittance and other fraudulent Activities.

2. Ad-hoc Committee on Thursday, 19th July, 2018 2.00pm Committee Room 117 Investigation of Allegations Senate New Building of Corruption against NNPC Trading Ltd.

3. Gas Resources Thursday, 19th July, 2018 1.00pm Committee Room 107 Senate New Building

4. Police Affairs Thursday, 19th July, 2018 2.00pm Committee Room 305 Senate New Building

5. Finance Thursday, 19th July, 2018 1.00pm Committee Room 211 (Emergency Meeting) Senate New Building 6. Information and National Monday, 23rd July, 2018 11.00am Conference Room 231 Orientation (Public Hearing) Senate New Building

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Ekweremadu leads Igbo Senators to protest ‘one-sided’ federal appointments

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Senators from the South East led by Deputy Senate President, Ike Ekweremadu have voiced their dissatisfaction with the appointments of head of agencies by President Muhammadu Buhari, claiming it has been lopsided.
The Deputy Senate President in his remarks on the floor of the Senate today lamented that appointments by the President are “unacceptable” and from a particular zone of the country.
Ekweremadu made the comments after Senate President Bukola Saraki read a letter from the President on board appointments into FERMA which is to be chaired by Tunde Lemo.
“I have a problem with the way government is directing its appointments,” Ekweremadu started.
He continued: “Over the last two or three weeks we have had cause to discuss this FERMA, or the NDIC, or AMCON. The head of all these parastatals have come from one particular part of Nigeria. This is completely unfair; we cannot seat in this Senate and allow that to go on.
“We need to ensure that every part of Nigeria is represented in the running of Nigeria. This completely unacceptable”
The Senate Leader, Ahmed Lawan in his response played down the comments made by Ekweremadu by urging him to look at the “larger picture”. He expressed conviction that there is no lop-sidedness as propounded by the Deputy Senate President, adding that the Federal Government has done its “homework” to comply with federal character.
The Senate President in his ruling warned against speculations and mandated the Senate Committee on Federal Character to examine the claims of Senator Ekweremadu. He also ruled Senator Chukwuka Utazi (PDP, Enugu) out of order after the Enugu Senator requested that the letter on the FERMA nomination be stood down.
Shortly after the ruling of the Senate President, the Senate Leader moved for the confirmation of the nomination of the Chairman (from Katsina State) and Commissioners for another agency, the Federal Civil Service Commission (FCSC). This again threw the red chamber into a rowdy session as more Igbo Senators joined the fray and revived the earlier controversy stirred by the comment of the Deputy Senate President.
Speaking on the matter, Senator Mao Ohuabunwa (PDP, Abia) argued that the confirmation of FCSC should be halted pending the submission of the report by the Committee on Federal Character.
The Senate President nevertheless ruled that the screening of the nominees will continue as scheduled. He however, assured that the screening report will only be considered after the submission of the report by the Committee on federal character next week Tuesday.
However, Senator Chukwuka Utazi in his submission insisted that the screening should be halted.
“If we want to be seen to be doing justice to all parts of the country then we should not continue with the screening. There is injustice already regarding appointments,” he objected.
The Senate President in his remarks reassured that there will be no final confirmation of nominees if the report by the Committee on Federal Character shows lop-sidedness in appointments.
The matter was then laid to rest despite additional protest from Senator Obinna Ogba (PDP, Ebonyi).
The nomination list for FERMA as sent by the President has Tunde Lemo as Chairman and Engr. Nurudeen Rafindadi as Managing Director. The Executive Directors are Bubas Abdullahi, Babagana Muhammed, Shehu Abdullahi, Lauretta Nwagono, Njedu Stanley, and Vincent Kolawole.

 

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