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NYU School Of Medicine grants free tuition to its students

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NEW YORK University’s School of Medicine announced on Thursday (Aug 16) that it is granting all of its students free tuition, regardless of merit or need, The New York Times reports.
The current 442 students attending will reportedly have the rest of their tuition paid in full through the medical program, and incoming students will receive their free tuition.
Citing the risk of “overwhelming” debt, it says every student will qualify regardless of merit or financial need.
NYU said financial worries were driving graduates to more lucrative specialities, pushing doctors away from more general positions.
“The scholarships will also be established, from here on out, to every future medical student at the school,” NYU stated in a press release.
Students must still however cover the cost of living expenses and accommodation.
The annual tuition was reportedly $55,018 and student debt by the time of graduation tallied at an average $191,000, according to a 2017 survey from the Association of American Medical Colleges.
Speaking to CNN, Rafael Rivera, NYU’s associate dean for admissions and financial aid said: “The debt can scare people away. One of those individuals could be the one to find a cure for cancer. For us, it’s important to have the best applicant pool possible, and society deserves nothing less.”

 

 

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Anambra and Homage to Education

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By C. Don Adinuba

The golden prize won by Regina Pacis Model Secondary School students in Onitsha, Anambra State, who participated in the $10,000 2018 Global Technovation Challange in which students from 115 countries participated on August 9 in California came to most Nigerians as a surprise. The school girls emerged victorious by designing an internet application to detect fake drugs, which has been a social scourge in the country and elsewhere. Nigerians were also surprised to learn of the bronze medal clinched by Tochukwu Anyigbo, a student of Lagoon Secondary School in Lagos, but sponsored by Governor Willie Obiano because she hails from Anambra State, in the International Robotics Competition held in Mexico a few days after the world competition in California. The prizes should not have surprised many Nigerians.

Anambra State has in the last few years been undergoing an unmistakable educational renaissance. In one of my most well received articles published in the mass media in January, 2016, entitled “Anambra: Leading the Return of Education and Enlightened Values”, I called national attention to the infectious enthusiasm which Gov Obiano, winner of the 1974 John Kennedy Memorial Essay Competition organized by the American Embassy in Lagos, has been demonstrating towards educational excellence. The immediate context was how Obiano invited to a meeting of the state Executive Council students of a public school who had just won the first prize in a Mock World Debate in South Korea as part of the preparation for the contest in Germany where they were also to do very well. He repeatedly called them heroes and heroines. The lads received rock star treatment which is reserved for mostly victorious football players in Nigeria.

Pius Okigbo, one of the most engaging economists and polyvalent intellectuals from modern Africa, must be feeling good in his grave at the turn of events in Anambra State. At the graduation lecture at the University of Lagos in 1992 entitled “Crisis in the Temple”, Okigbo showed with facts and figures that the intellectual tradition has been abandoned in Nigeria even by the universities. Higher institutions were no longer paying homage to knowledge but to mammon, as the rest of Nigerian society engaged in what Okigbo called calibration of our national life in pecuniary terms. He cited several examples of how our universities were falling over themselves to award honorary degrees to barely literate “men and women of power and money”, and not to persons of ideas or integrity.

Therefore, Okigbo must be satisfied, wherever he may be now, to see his state governor demonstrate reverence to knowledge rather than mammon, as the scripture calls money in a very derogatory manner. He must be proud that his home state has in recent times been excelling in various competitions. Loretto Special Science School at Adazi, Anaocha Local Government Area, for instance, last year won the first prize in the senior secondary school category of an intensive of assessment of schools throughout Nigeria while Queen of the Rosary Secondary School in Onitsha took the first position in the junior secondary school category. Ave Sancta Maria School, also in Onitsha, made the best result among primary schools, and Clement Okodo from Abagana in Njikoka Local Government Area was judged the best primary school teacher in Nigeria.

A teacher in another school in the state won the previous year the award of the Best Teacher in a nationwide competition sponsored by Nigerian Breweries plc. Olusegun Adeniyi, former presidential special adviser who now chairs Thisday editorial board and participated in the teacher’s award, told me in a private conversation that he found Anambra teachers very competitive in every area.

Anambra is the only state in Nigeria where teachers generally higher than civil servants. Science, English and Igbo teachers receive an additional 10% of their salaries because these subjects are considered key. Those who teach in hard-to-reach places like Anambra West Local Government Area which is a riparian place, are paid an additional 20%. In other words, a science or English or Igbo teacher in a hard-to-reach place earns not just his or her monthly salary like the counterpart in the civil service but an extra 40%.

The impression should not be given that Governor Obiano pays great attention to basic education but not higher education, for it will be misleading. He made it possible for medical students of the state university to graduate for the first time since they were admitted nine years earlier into medical school. They could not graduate because the medical school established by ex Governor Peter Obi failed get the accreditation from the Medical and Dental Registration Council of Nigeria which regulates medical education. It was starved of funds. It did not possess the right number and caliber of staff, the right equipment and other critical facilities. Obiano quickly provided the needed funds, with a directive to the authorities to get it accredited for training not just medical doctors but also specialists. Gynaecologists, paedetricians and other consultants are today trained there.

At Executive Council meetings, Obiano defers to professor members. In the middle of a debate, he often would say, “I rule in your favour because the professors are supporting you. You know I admire professors because of their knowledge”. No wonder, the two education commissioners, both incidentally female, are professors. Kate Omenugha, Commissioner for Basic Education, is the hardworking Nigeria’s second mass communication female professor and Theresa Nkechi Obiekezie, the young Commissioner for Higher Education, is a geophysics professor who in 2010 won the African Union-World Academy of Science National Young Scientist following a ground breaking research in life and earth sciences.

In consideration of Anambra’s prioritization of education, former World Bank vice president Oby Ezekwesili who is an ex Minister of Education, counselled the state government two years ago to take education from its list of economic enablers to its list of development pillars. Ezekwesili advised the governor to consider making the state Nigeria’s knowledge hub the way Massachusetts has become in the United States. California is another American knowledge centre. California would be the fifth or sixth largest economy in the world if it were a separate country. Its economy is driven by ICT and entertainment, and its excellent institutions like Stanford Business School are central to the development. The United Kingdom earns huge revenues from its excellent education. The University of Manchester prides itself on soft power because it has produced, more than any other British higher institution, more foreign heads of state, prime ministers and other leaders.

Any government, national or sub national, which places premium on knowledge is most likely to do well. Therefore, it is no surprise that Anambra State has been doing exceedingly well in various areas in the last few years. Just a month ago, Vice President Yemi Osinbajo, assisted by Health Minister Isaac Adewole, presented the first prize for excellent immunization campaign to the Anambra State government. Of course, the state remains Nigeria’s safest, and is increasingly recognized as the most peaceful and socially harmonious state in Nigeria. It has the best road network in the country and the rate of its agricultural and industrial development is very impressive. The only state to increase workers’ salaries in the past six years, Anambra always pays workers and pensioners before any other. These are, indeed, good times for the government and people of Anambra State.

It says a lot about Gov Obiano’s attitude towards education that a number of his commissioners and other senior officials have just returned from a leadership programme at Harvard. Another set will soon leave for the Lagos Business School. The significance of Obiano’s commitment to lifelong learning and development is the topic of another article. In the meantime, other states can borrow a leaf from Anambra which has proved to be truly the Light of the Nation.


Adinuba is Anambra State Commissioner for Information & Public Enlightenment.

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NANS Bans Awards

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The National Association of Nigerian Students, NANS has banned all forms of awards and recognitions on behalf of the group until further notice.

President of NANS, Danielson Bamidele Akpan announced the ban in Abuja at the inauguration of new executives.
The NANS president, joined by other youths urged government to step-up funding for education and ensure entitlements of lecturers and teachers are not unnecessarily delayed leading to industrial action.

Ahead of the 2019 elections, the students’ body warned politicians against financial inducement of less privileged students in order to use them as thugs.
The students further called for peaceful coexistence and unity among Nigerians as the country goes into general elections.

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In Brief – Anambra Again : Good news from Adazi Nnukwu

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Anita Mary Charles, Loretto Adazi Student who won 1st Position in the just concluded MAN Mathematics Examination Senior Secondary Cathegory, in Anambra State enroute National Mathematical Center Abuja to represent the state at the National Level along side the Students from Tansi International college Awka (2nd Position) and Marist College Nteje (3rd Position). Hoping for a good outing as we expect d result. IT’S ALL ABOUT MISSION SCHOOLS.


Contributor :  Obijekwu Barth Ifediora

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Stormzy launches Cambridge scholarship for black students

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The Stormzy Scholarship will fund two black students to attend the prestigious university.

STORMZY is a true champion for black excellence.
The rapper recently announced the launch of a publishing imprint called Merky Books to help young writers become published authors and donated £9,000 to an Oxford student’s crowdfunder for her to go to Harvard in the US.
Now, the hitmaker is adding to that list of good deeds, after announcing that he will help fund two black British students to go to Cambridge University.
The Stormzy Scholarship will pay for tuition fees and provide a maintenance grant for up to four years of an undergraduate course.
The first two students will start their courses at the beginning of the new academic year this October with two further students selected for 2019 entry. This year’s entries will be self-funded by Stormzy however, he hopes to engage more support from additional investors to become part of the scheme.
Speaking to the BBC, the Cold MC said: “It’s so important for black students, especially, to be aware that it can 100% be an option to attend a university of this calibre. We’re a minority, the playing ground isn’t level for us and it’s vital that all potential students are given the same opportunity.”
He added: “There are so many young black kids all over the country who have the level of academic excellence to study at a university such as Cambridge – however we are still under represented at leading universities.
“I hope this scholarship serves as a small reminder that if young black students wish to study at one of the best universities in the world, then the opportunity is yours for the taking – and if funding is one of the barriers, then we can work towards breaking that barrier down.”
Stormzy announced the scheme at his old school, Harris Academy in Crystal Palace, south London on A-level results day.
The University of Cambridge’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stephen Toope, commented: “Stormzy is an inspiration, not just for his music but for his engagement on social issues and encouragement of young people. He has achieved great success in his career, but recognises that this was at the expense of his studies and the option of a place at a top university.
“He wants to inspire talented young black people who have their sights set on university to follow their dreams. The studentships are a beacon for black students who might otherwise have felt they could not come to Cambridge.”
Since announcing the Stormzy scholarship, fans on social media have praised the rapper for showing support to the youth.
Journalist Nadine White tweeted: “Stormzy has been making so many moves to enhance the lives of other people. #StormzyScholarship? I could cry. That’s beautiful.”Another Twitter user wrote: “Great to see #stormzy giving back to his community”
See more reactions below:

To be eligible for a 2018 entry ‘The Stormzy Scholarship’ applicants must be of black ethnicity and be holding an unconditional offer.
Applications must be submitted no later than Friday 31 August 2018.

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Anambra School Girls Win Gold in World Technovation Challenge in US

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Anambra School Girls Win Gold in World Technovation Challenge in US

By James Eze (eziokwubundu@gmail.com)
The five Anambra girls from Regina Pacies Secondary School Onitsha who represented Nigeria and Africa at the World Technovation Challenge in the Silicon Valley in San Francisco, US last night have won the Gold Medal in the contest.
The team, led by Uchenna Onwuamaegbu Ugwu defeated representatives of other technological giants including the USA, Spain, Turkey, Uzbekistan and China to clinch the gold medal.
The Anambra girls who have now become Africa’s Golden Girls is made up of five brilliant girls including
1 Promise Nnalue
2 Jessica Osita
3 Nwabuaku Ossai
4 Adaeze Onuigbo
5 Vivian Okoye
The world champions who are reported to be attracting a lot of attention in the world’s greatest technological hub won the Challenge with a mobile application called the FD-Detector which they developed to help tackle the Challenge of fake pharmaceutical products in Nigeria.
Under the tutelage of Uchenna Onwuamaegbu-Ugwu the CEO of Edufun Technik STEM, the Golden Girls spent five months researching and developing FD-Detector which swept through over 2000 competing applications to get to the finals in San Francisco.
Technovation is a programme that offers girls around the world the opportunity to learn the programming skills they need to emerge as tech-entrepreneurs and leaders.
Every year, girls are invited to identify a problem in their communities, and then challenge them to solve them by developing Andriod applications that would address those problems.
115 countries participated in the qualifiers but only 12 teams from all over the world were selected as finalists for the pitch in Silicon Valley.
The girls will also be attending Field trips, life-changing workshops including a networking session during their one week stay in USA.
The Governor of Anambra State,Chief Willie Obiano had personally sent them off to the US in a brief ceremony at the last Executive Council Meeting where he charged the girls to put Nigeria and Africa on the global technological map with their rare talent.

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Education

Sex education lessons from Mississippi and Nigeria

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Nigeria and Mississippi are a world apart physically, but the rural American state and the African country have much in common when it comes to the obstacles they had to overcome to implement sex education in their schools.
Three lessons about overcoming these obstacles come out of research that several colleagues and I conducted on how sex education came to be in Nigeria and Mississippi.
The lessons are particularly relevant for similarly religious and conservative places where people often worry – as they do throughout the world – that teaching young people about contraception and condoms will make them more likely to have sex. The lessons also come as the United States itself is embroiled in an ongoing controversy over whether to fund comprehensive sex education or emphasize the abstinence-only approach. More than half of states in the U.S. require that sex education stress abstinence. Comprehensive sex education in African and other developing countries is more the exception than the rule.

Sex education does not cause more sex

Although people often worry that sex education will lead to promiscuity, the evidence doesn’t support the notion that sex education makes young people more sexually active – at least not in the United States or in Africa.
Despite the fact that comprehensive sex education has been shown to protect adolescent health, it can be difficult to dispel fears that it will corrupt young people and reduce parental and religious authority. This is particularly so in socially conservative places.

Different approaches

Not all sex education is created equal. The gold standard from a health perspective is referred to as “comprehensive” sex education. The Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States defines this as “age-appropriate, medically accurate information on a broad set of topics related to sexuality including human development, relationships, decision making, abstinence, contraception and disease prevention.”
Comprehensive sex education has been shown to delay the age of the first sexual encounter, increase use of condoms and contraception, and reduce rates of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.
Comprehensive sex education is very different than abstinence-only education. Abstinence-only education, in best-case scenarios, teaches the same life skills but without reference to contraception. Most of the research on abstinence-only education finds it to be less effective than comprehensive sex education in delaying the first sexual encounter, increasing condom use or reducing the number of sexual partners.

Same problems, different places

Why compare experiences of sex education in a mid-sized U.S. state to those in the most populous country in Africa? It turns out Mississippi and Nigeria share some key similarities.
Mississippi is among the U.S. states with the highest teen pregnancy rates. In Nigeria, almost a quarter of women have begun childbearing by age 19.
Mississippi and Nigeria are also highly religious and rural. Both also have underfunded education and health systems. Despite these conditions, Nigeria mandated the teaching of sex education in 2001. However, implementation didn’t begin in earnest until 2011 with the support of a grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. By that time, the curriculum had shifted from comprehensive to abstinence-only. Mississippi required school districts to implement sex education by 2012 but under similarly restrictive conditions.
The jury is still out on the effects of sex education in Mississippi and Nigeria. However, some positive evidence exists for both places. For instance, in Mississippi, more than three-quarters of instructors surveyed in 2015 believed that sex education was promoting healthy relationships. And in four states in Nigeria, researchers concluded that the curriculum increased students’ confidence to refuse unwanted sex.
Three lessons about overcoming controversies around sex education emerged from my research in Nigeria and Mississippi.

Local organizations are crucial

First, strong, local organizations are necessary to promote sex education. In both places, homegrown organizations lobbied, connected people and provided legitimacy to the idea of teaching sex education. Crucially, these organizations were supported by funding from private donors or the federal government.
The Women’s Foundation of Mississippi funded and published a report showing the cost of teen pregnancy to taxpayers. The Center for Mississippi Health Policy supported a 2011 survey that showed parents overwhelmingly supported sex education. Mississippi First trains teachers on comprehensive sex education. It also helps channel funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to school districts that teach evidence-based sex education curricula.
In Nigeria, Action Health Incorporated led a coalition of NGOs, professional associations, donor organizations and federal ministries to form a task force. The task force helped write guidelines for sex education in 1996 that led to the adoption of curriculum in 2001. The Association for Reproductive and Family Health led the nationwide implementation of the curriculum with support from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

A cure for societal ills

Second, to promote sex education, these organizations presented sex education as a solution to social problems. In Mississippi, the problem was identified as the taxpayer cost of teen pregnancy. In Nigeria, it was the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
The Mississippi Economic Policy Center found in 2011 that the county-by-county cost of teen pregnancy to taxpayers was an estimated US$155 million in 2009. This cost was due to lost tax revenue, medical care, public assistance, foster care and other expenses. In Nigeria, data in the late 1990s indicated that 2 to 4 million Nigerians – approximately 5 percent of the adult population – were HIV positive. Many feared that Nigeria’s epidemic would come to resemble those in southern Africa. Sex education, which promised to reduce teen pregnancy and quell HIV transmission, served as a solution to these problems.

Compromise is necessary

Third, those promoting sex education were strategic. Proponents reached out to religious leaders, school officials and parents in order to allay their fears about teaching their kids about sex. And they made sure to stress that sex education was about health and life skills.
Still, in Mississippi and Nigeria, supporters had to compromise about the content of the curriculum. They agreed to change words and remove controversial sections. Consequently, in Mississippi, school districts can choose to teach abstinence-only curriculum. Condom demonstrations are not permitted, and the curriculum must be taught in gender-segregated classrooms. In Nigeria, the name of the curriculum was changed from the “National Comprehensive Sexuality Education Curriculum” to the more euphemistic “Family Life and HIV Education.” In addition, several more conservative states removed the words “sex” and “breast,” as well as images that show sexually transmitted infections.
While there is no universal way to ensure access to sex education, the experiences in Nigeria and Mississippi show that it can be done – even in places that are most resistant to the idea.

 

Rachel Sullivan Robinson
Associate Professor, American University School of International Service

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Kenyan writer Makena Onjerika wins 2018 Caine Prize for African Writing

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Kenyan writer Makena Onjerika has won the 2018 Caine Prize for African Writing – often described as Africa’s leading literary award, for her short story entitled “Fanta Blackcurrant”, published in Wasafiri (2017).
The ceremony was held for the second time in Senate House in partnership with SOAS University of London and the Centre for African Studies.

The Chair of the Caine Prize judging panel, award winning Ethiopian-American novelist and writer, Dinaw Mengestu, announced Makena as the winner of the £10,000 prize at an award dinner on Monday 2 July.
Narrated in the first person plural, “Fanta Blackcurrant” follows Meri, a street child of Nairobi, who makes a living using her natural intelligence and charisma, but wants nothing more than ‘a big Fanta Blackcurrant for her to drink every day and it never finish”. While it seems Meri’s natural wit may enable her to escape the streets, days follow days and years follow years, and having turned to the sex trade, she finds herself pregnant. Her success stealing from Nairobi’s business women attracts the attention of local criminals, who beat her and leave her for dead. After a long recovery, Meri ‘crossed the river and then we do not know where she went’.
Dinaw Mengestu praised the story in his remarks, saying, “the winner of this year’s Caine Prize is as fierce as they come – a narrative forged but not defined by the streets of Nairobi, a story that stands as more than just witness. Makena Onjerika’s ‘Fanta Blackcurrant’ presides over a grammar and architecture of its own making, one that eschews any trace of sentimentality in favour of a narrative that is haunting in its humour, sorrow and intimacy”.
Makena is a graduate of the MFA Creative Writing programme at New York University, and has been published in Urban Confustions and Wasifiri. She lives in Nairobi, Kenya, and is currently working on a fantasy novel.
The Caine Prize for African Writing is a literature prize awarded to an African writer of a short story published in English. The Prize was launched in 2000 to encourage and highlight the richness and diversity of African writing by bringing it to a wider audience internationally. The focus on the short story reflects the contemporary development of the African story-telling tradition.

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Lancaster University Ghana offers African students UK degree at their doorstep

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Ranked among the top ten universities in all the three major rankings in the United Kingdom, the University of Lancaster is one of the major educational destinations for foreign students studying in the UK.
Since the first set of students were admitted in 1964, the collegiate university has consistently strived to be among the best universities in the UK. This culminated in it being named among top 150 universities in the world and the 2018 University of the Year by The Times and Sunday Times.

In 2013, the university opened its first full-fledged campus in West Africa in Ghana. This campus allows students from across Africa to access Lancaster’s academic excellence in teaching and research on the African continent. For African students willing to be educated at Lancaster, the Ghana campus offers them that opportunities to have a UK degree at one-third of the price at their doorstep.

With the cost of acquiring travelling documents and moving to another continent eliminated, African students who choose to study in Ghana can do so knowing that the cost is not prohibitive. In addition, it offers scholarships, flexible payment plans and fee discounts, and there is a transfer opportunity to the UK campus, summer exchange programmes and internships.
The transfer can be done once the foundation year has been completed.
Moreover, students learn in a safe environment that is close to an airport, gyms, restaurants malls and recreational facilities.
The Ghana campus started with 67 students in 2013 and now has about 500. It also has an executive MBA programme.
Graduates from the school are automatically part of the thriving alumni network of over 100,000 alumni across 148 countries around the world.
Students are also supported to get employment or further studies. They are offered work placements, one-to-one support, as well as CV and interview skills training.

 

This article is a sponsored content brought to you by Lancaster University Ghana

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500 students get US women scholarship

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Nigeria Women Association of Georgia (NWAG) has awarded scholarships to 506 female college students and shipped medical supplies worth $2 million to Nigeria.
President of the association, Dr Stella Etta, stated at the 18th Annual Awards Banquet at Atlanta, USA, that the association gave the scholarships since it was founded in 2000.
Etta said NWAG shipped the medical supplies million to Nigerian hospitals.
The association is a group of accomplished Nigerian women residing in the State of Georgia, with the aim of impacting on the lives of Nigerians at the homeland and in the diaspora.
“Currently, NWAG supports 12 orphanages in 11 states in Nigeria and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) through the ‘Beacon 100’ campaign.
“We have awarded 506 scholarships to female college students across the 36 states and the FCT and has so far awarded 52 one-time scholarships to high school seniors in Georgia.
“Last year, we increased the number of containers of medical supplies shipped to hospitals in Nigeria to five containers worth over $2 million to 13 community hospitals in 12 states.
“Efforts with our community outreach programmes in Metro Atlanta, help promote the Nigerian culture, change some of the common misconceptions about our home country and narrow the cultural gap between our various cultures,’’ Etta said.
In the USA, she listed the three 2018 Georgia winners of the NWAG’s scholarship to include Chigozie Amaeze, Justin Egbosiuba and Janet Nkwocha.
A cross-section of Nigerian women at the 18th Annual Award Banquet organised by the Nigerian Women Association of Georgia at Atlanta, USA (NAN Photo)
Etta also said the 2018 scholarships and orphanage awards for Nigeria would hold on Oct. 25 in Abuja and would feature 37 female students from the 36 states and the FCT.
“The 37 female students will receive the naira equivalent of $300 each.
“In addition, 12 orphanages will receive the naira equivalent of $700 dollar each for meals and toys.’’
According to her, the orphanages include the Little Saints, Palm Grove, Lagos; Seventh Day Adventist, Edoha, Rivers; Susana Home, Aba; Anamwim Home, Abuja; Zume Memorial, Irrua, Edo; God’s will, Anyigba and Care Peoples Foundation, Ibadan among others.
Etta also said the association had made substantial impacts in Nigeria’s health sector through its annual medical mission’s health care delivery in communities across the country.
In the U.S., she said NWAG “is planning a milestone project – the Nigeria Centre for Arts, Culture and Empowerment in Georgia – to promote Nigeria’s culture and to expand and enrich the organisation’s mission.
Etta said the centre would host lectures on Nigeria and Africa, Nigerian languages, women and children empowerment programmes, library and archiving of Nigerian historical documents and artefacts.
She said the organisation hoped to expand its projects and reach.
She, therefore, called for more support from well-meaning individuals and non-profit organisations. (NAN)

 

-Prudence Arobani

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Sex-for-marks: OAU sacks Prof. Akindele

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The Governing Council of Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-Ife, has dismissed Prof. Richard Akindele who was allegedly involved in a sex-for-marks scandal.
Prof. Eyitope Ogunbodede, the Vice Chancellor of OAU, announced Akindele’s dismissal in a statement on Wednesday in Ile-Ife.
The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the vice chancellor of the university had on April 19 confirmed the suspension of Akindele pending the findings of the investigative panel.
Miss Monica Osagie, a student in the Masters of Business programme, had released a recorded telephone conversation, which went viral, in which the lecturer identified as Akindele demanded five rounds of sex to enhance her marks.
Ogunbodede said that the University Senate at its meeting on June 14 considered the committee’s finding that Akindele had an inappropriate relationship with his student.
He said this was established through their conversation in the audio recording, his reply to the query, the oral evidence and the printed ‘WhatsApp conversations’ tendered before the committee.
The vice chancellor said Akindele had acted in a manner that compromised his position as a teacher and examiner in that his conversations with Osagie were about examination scores and inducement of favour for the alteration of examination scores.
Ogunbodede said : ” He offered to change Miss Osagie’s purported “33%” result to a pass mark in consideration for sexual favours; this was established in the audio recording which he admitted.
” His claim that Miss Osagie knew that she had passed with a score of ‘45’ but was seeking to score an ‘A’ and that this led to him being sexually harassed by Miss Osagie cannot be supported by any evidence.
” Professor Akindele’s actions in requesting for sexual favours from Miss Osagie to change her examination scores was scandalous behaviour that has brought ridicule to the name of the university and has tarnished the reputation of the university, as it portrays the university as an institution where its teachers and examiners trade marks for sexual favours.
” From the evidence, Miss Osagie had no idea that she scored ‘45’, a pass mark as later claimed by Professor Akindele, although she later found out she did not fail the course.
” Professor Akindele’s claim that he reported Miss Osagie’s ‘harassment’ to his colleagues cannot be supported by any evidence as all his colleagues denied it and one mentioned that she only talked about the matter with him after the audio recording was released over the internet.
” Professor Akindele operated in a position of power and authority over Miss Osagie and as such sexually harassed her.
” Professor Akindele was liable for all the allegations of misconduct levelled against him.’’
The vice chancellor said the Senate recommended that Akindele, having been found liable on all the allegations against him, should be dismissed from the services of the university.
” The Council, at its meeting of today, Wednesday, 20th of June, 2018, having considered the recommendation of Senate, as well as the report of the Joint Committee of Council and Senate, decided that Professor Richard I. Akindele should be dismissed from the services of the university for gross misconduct.
” The university has also taken further steps to ensure the total elimination of Sexual Harassment (SH) in the OAU community.
“The university has a legal duty to prevent sexual and gender-based harassment within the institution and ensure that both men and women are protected from this menace; and thereby provide conducive environment for teaching and learning,’’ he said.
Ogunbodede said in order to create conducive environment for teaching and learning, the university was creating more awareness and disseminating information on what constitutes sexual harassment within the university.
He said the veracity of sexual harassment concepts includes sexual solicitation and advances, sex exploitation, prostitution, seduction, pimping, sexual assault, unwanted touching, vulgar sexual jokes and rape among others.
Ogunbodede said that OAU was fully committed to the eradication of sexual and other types of harassment from the university and would do all that was possible to nip the menace in the bud.
” OAU has zero tolerance for sexual harassment and as a renowned university will do everything humanly possible to maintain the rules and regulations of the university,’’ he said.(NAN)

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Book Review : The Morning Sunset By Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru

 

By Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru
The Morning Sunset is a book written to sensitize our people over the issue of engaging in a perilous journey to Europe via Libya. It is a story written for everyone: the youths; kids; fathers and mothers. The continuing migration of people into Europe across the Mediterranean is unnecessary. People are not born to waste their future that way.
The Morning Sunset is simply passing a message to people in Africa. Those that have not been opportuned to visit western world think that it is a bed of roses. In fact a paradise . Where as it is not like that. Many chose to come in search of greener pastures. They believe that Europe is the only place they will have the opportunity to get a better life for themselves and that of their families.

My messages to Nigerians and Africans are that our people should not abandon any tangible thing they have or their education just to embark on this long and dangerous journey through road and desert because the life in Europe does not worth such risk . Also let some parents and relatives be aware especially those that are anxiously waiting for the day their beloved children will come back from Europe but they never knew that the bones of their children have been rotten in Sahara deserts and in the seas of foreign land.

 


Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru is originally from Nigeria but lived in Italy for several years before moving to Leicester , UK.

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