Connect with us

Life & Style

Africa-made luxury loungewear takes on big brands

Published

on

For centuries, unfinished materials for clothing manufacture – silk, cotton, hides – have been sold and shipped from Africa to the fashion capitals of the West, such as London, Paris and New York. In return, a small number of ready-to-wear clothes, cheap shoes and second hand garments head back to Africa – at vastly marked-up prices or as charity donations.
Now an ambitious start-up called the Walls of Benin, led by 30-year-old Chi Atanga, a man of Cameroonian descent born in Manchester, England, seeks to break with history by building factories in Africa that make sleepwear and loungewear—comfortable casual clothing that is stylish and sophisticated, suitable for “all night raves, boats, trains and jet planes,” according to the company’s website. Finished items are sold to high-end shops in Europe for their fashion-hungry clientele.
The brand name Walls of Benin refers to the world’s largest man-made structure, which was completed in the 15th century: a system of moats and ramparts designed to defend the ancient Kingdom of Benin, which is Benin City, the capital of present-day Edo State, Nigeria.
Atanga calls himself “chief evangelist,” instead of chief executive officer, of Walls of Benin, and says that the company’s goal is “to spread soft power through culture.”

Taking on the Goliath
Atanga researched and designed the business plan for Walls of Benin. Buoyed by $100,000 seed money from the Portuguese government and an apprenticeship with the Erasmus European Entrepreneur Programme, he was able to finance his dream. “Using his gift for networking, Atanga secured an investment from the Lunan Group, the team behind the well-known brand Fiorelli,” according to facetofaceafrica.com, an online publication.
He is now setting up production operations in a “special economic zone” outside the coastal city of Mombasa, Kenya’s second-largest city.
“Our concept is not about riding the stereotype, Africa-to-Europe, textile/raw materials value chain, but a new paradigm,” he declares. “Can we take on the Goliath Victoria’s Secret on lingerie in Africa?” he asks, and answers with a firm “Yes!”
How will it work? “Our business model is simple: we take the spirit of African print textiles and swap wax and heavy cloth for more luxurious and ecological fabrics,” he says. Kente, Ghana’s famous silk-and-cotton blend, is an example of an African fabric, while silk and Tencel are natural fibres with extra softness and moisture-wicking properties. “We feel fashion brands in top cities in Europe should manufacture some of their wares in Africa and create jobs, and not merely export jeans, suits and other garments to Africa.”
His first trip to Africa as an adult was to Ghana in 2014, and it was an eye-opener. “Everything was bright, vibrant and alive. It amazed me to see African print textiles everywhere. It dawned on me that this was a part of my heritage.
Currently, Walls of Benin operates from Kenya and Rwanda and it is importing silk and Tencel from Portugal. In April 2018, the company partnered with Wildlife Works, a wildlife conservation group based in Kenya, to launch an African production. The hope is to export luxury loungewear made of extra-soft silk and Tencel to Europe and elsewhere. The production is first of its kind on the continent.
Wildlife Works can manufacture a thousand loungewear items per week using digital screen prints. “From the east of Africa to the south of Europe, we are building the value chain,” enthuses Atanga. He believes that the loungewear fashion industry in Africa, once ignored, has a bright future.
Meanwhile, rapid changes are taking place on a continent that a top British supermodel once chided for not having a Vogue magazine. “Africa’s fashion industry is right now super exciting! It is new, at the same time it is centuries old. We are talking about the 55 countries in Africa and huge diaspora populations with billions of dollars of spending power,” says Atanga.

Exciting times ahead
The rise of the middleclass in Africa and partnerships with established foreign brands help boost the fashion industry on the continent. In addition, the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), a US law that seeks to expand trade and investments with sub-Saharan Africa, “gives duty-free access to the US for selected sub-Saharan African countries,” according to African Business, a leading publication on Africa. American companies are looking to invest in Africa’s fashion industry.
Africans can tap into the $12 billion US loungewear market through AGOA, which was recently extended to 2025, maintains Atanga.
His company helps to create jobs by working with eucalyptus farmers and other suppliers who produce raw materials. Eucalyptus pulpwood is industrially spun to produce fabrics that are breathable and cooling.
Also, a dozen local smallholder Kenyan cotton producers have received specialist textile training from Walls of Benin to spin and twist fibre into yarn, weave and knit the yarn into fabric, and bleach, dye and print the fabric to create fashionable sleepwear.

Why begin operations in Kenya? Africa Renewal asked Atanga.
“We chose Kenya because, along with Ethiopia, citizens know the value of a homegrown fashion industry. [These countries] have established training centres to educate indigenous entrepreneurs about diversifying into luxury garments.”
Fashion giants such as Sweden’s H&M also have their eyes on Africa’s fashion industry. With support from Swedfund, the Swedish government’s development financing arm, H&M is establishing a textile factory in Ethiopia that will create about 4,000 jobs. Mr. Atanga predicts that with wages rising, many Chinese textile companies will relocate to Africa.
“Monthly wages are rising to $200 per employee in China, while it’s about $120 in East Africa,” he says.
Atanga is pleased that some countries in East Africa want to ban the import of secondhand clothing. Rwanda already has. Tanzania and Uganda were considering the bad, while Kenya seemed poised to but later backtracked on its decision. Angered by the ban, the US is threatening to exclude such countries from AGOA eligibility status. The ban on used clothing “is a masterstroke,” insists Atanga.
Also, relative political stability and the ease of doing business in East Africa is good for investors, according to the young entrepreneur. “In some countries, one must pay bribes to get the necessary business permits, and electricity supply is pitiful,” he says.
Other challenges abound in the textile industry. “Although African textile has an annual value of $4 billion, only 19 per cent of it is branded. We lack adequate finance to patent and effectively secure our fabrics ecosystem. We also don’t want women and children to spend 18 hours in factories while missing out on school,” Atanga adds.
His mixed heritage is inspiring him to use Africa as a backdrop for his investments in the loungewear industry. As a young child he sold bonbons shipped from Cameroon on school playgrounds in Manchester. “I would add my own ‘import tax,’ because they were made in Cameroon. They were a little more valuable, being imported from Africa,” he says, smiling.
“I knew that creating a brand that covers African-made loungewear for sale in Europe could be profitable. This drove me to Portugal to work with high-quality tradesmen, brands and garments, and to East Africa.”
On the luxury price point for the pajama sets, he told face to face Africa, “We think at £195 [$260] we are being fair. Silk is not cheap and we have taken a lot of time and effort to create a luxury product but at the same time keep the retail price accessible.”
For now, Atanga is focused on his passion for making quality clothes in Africa and exporting them to Europe. “I want to create wealth in the fashion industry in an ethical way,” he concludes.


Agencies

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Forget Milan. African Fashion Is Taking Over the World.

Published

on

Neither of the co-founders of the luxury African e-commerce company OXOSI came at it from a fashion background. They started the online retailer out of a shared appreciation for safeguarding culture — African culture. Defining “African fashion” is close to impossible, but Kolade Adeyemo and Akin Adebowale (both from Nigeria) are taking on the challenge with an almost manic conviction, so that the “art and design of Afromodernism can live forever,” according to the website. They both understand OXOSI is their opportunity to rewrite the African narrative — and they’re not holding back.
With a company name that means “God of Justice and Wilderness,” they are hoping to tame the wilds of fashion. Walk into their simply designed office in Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood and you’ll see a team of millennials dedicated to the goal of showing the world that Africa is a force to be reckoned with — from art and music to design, literature and, especially, fashion.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Nigeria World Cup kit nominated for fashion award

Published

on

The Super Eagles jersey has been shortlisted for ‘Design of the Year’ Beazley Designs Award

NIGERIA’S WORLD Cup jersey was certainly a hit among supporters.
The Nigerian Nike kit sold out within minutes, and was seen on celebrities from Michael B. Jordan to Wizkid – and now the in demand clothing has been nominated for the Beazley Designs of the Year 2018, an annual award and exhibition run by London’s Design Museum.
According to CNN, the 87 nominees – which includes the popular kit and Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty line – span a total of six categories including products, transport, graphics, fashion, digital and architecture.
In addition to the Fenty Beauty line and Nigeria’s 2018 World Cup kit, other Design of The Year nominees include bio-leather made from yeast, Sony’s Aibo robotic dog, the new Louvre museum in Abu Dhabi, a video game that trains players to spot fake news, Palomo’s gender-bending men’s fashion line, the SpaceX Falcon rocket, and the world’s first plastic-free shopping aisle.
The Guardian reports that the nominees were whittled down from 560 submissions. The museum said it was the most international list of contenders in the prize’s history.
The overall award winner, which is described as “revealing the most innovative designs of the last year,” will be announced on November 15, along with a winner for each of the aforementioned categories.

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Andela appoints Omowale David-Ashiru as country director

Published

on

Andela has appointed Omowale David-Ashiru as its Nigeria country director.
She succeeded Seni Suleyman, who was appointed the vice president of Andela’s global operations in April.
As the country director, Omowale will be responsible for leading Andela Nigeria, a rapidly growing team of 500+ people, and ensuring that the organization continues to advance its objectives of developing Africa’s future technology leaders.

Before joining Andela, Omowale’s professional experience spanned almost two decades in management consulting and entrepreneurship. During her eleven years at Accenture, she grew to become a seasoned Management Consultant and Certified Project Manager.
Omowale then transitioned into entrepreneurship, launching a fashion retail company, which she managed for eight years. Her experience managing complex projects for global technology and financial services companies, combined with her entrepreneurial mindset, makes Omowale the right leader for Andela Nigeria.
“Everything I’ve done before now feels like a preparation for this role,” says Omowale, “and I’m excited to join this wonderful team of highly motivated individuals who are investing their skills and effort into advancing opportunity and potential in Nigeria and the continent at large.”
Seni Sulyman, Andela’s Vice President of Global Operations and previous Country Director, Nigeria, shared his excitement about Nigeria’s new Country Director: “Omowale has the right mix of relevant experiences in leadership, management and entrepreneurship to lead the next phase of Andela Nigeria’s growth,” he said, “and I’m particularly excited because she shares the same values and aspirations as Andelans.”
He continued, “Andela Nigeria, our first office in Africa, is rapidly growing, and I have complete confidence in Omowale’s ability to lead the team as we continue to scale.”
Omowale obtained a First Class B.Sc. in Economics from the University of Ibadan. In her own words, she has a deep passion for people, is an avid reader and loves adventure. Omowale joined Andela on September 3rd, 2018.

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Bloc Party’s Kele Okereke announces first stage project

Published

on

BLOC PARTY frontman Kele Okereke has announced his theatre debut in Leave The Remain.
Okereke has announced his first stage project, which will see him scoring the new play, which is directed by Robby Graham, alongside Matt Jones.
The production, which opens in Hammersmith , UK in January, follows the story of a young gay couple suddenly faced with an uncertain future.
The story is “told through a mixture of music, drama and movement” and the Streets Been Talkin’ hitmaker drew from his own experiences while creating the soundtrack to the play.
He said: “Leave to Remain is the story of what happens when a marriage forces two very different families to come together.
“For the music for this project I took cues from the records that my parents would play in our house when I was growing up, West African high-life music, and I tried to combine those sounds with the electronic dance music I hear in clubs today.
“It was important to me to make something that represented the meeting of two very different worlds.”
The show will feature Olivier Award nominated actor Tyrone Huntley in the lead role of “Obi”, with the full cast to be announced shortly.
The musical features songs such as Not The Drugs Talking, which gives off a similar vibe to the electro-rock sound in Okereke’s debut solo album and Bloc Party’s Intimacy.
The musician and his boyfriend of almost 10 years became fathers to a daughter in 2016 and he knows that gay couples can provide as much love as a traditional family setup.
He said: said: “I don’t feel it’s my role to explain myself to people or explain how I live my life. There will be some people who don’t get it. There are always going to be people that will have a problem with you and you don’t have to go round appeasing them.
“You just have to do you in the best way you can. That’s what I’m going to instill in my daughter.”

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Genevieve Nnaji: “We should change the way we tell our stories”

Published

on

Once the highest-paid female actor in Nollywood, Genevieve Nnaji has a love-hate relationship with the Nigerian film industry, but is now doing things her way as a writer and producer

Genevieve Nnaji sweeps into her office in the Lekki Phase 1 development on Lagos Island, offers a diffident hello to the folks in the lobby, and skips up the stairs. After greeting her disappearing form, the occupants of the reception area return their gaze to a Nollywood film in Yoruba playing on a screen hanging on the wall. It is the type of melodrama that made Nnaji’s name in Nigeria and around the continent. But over the past few years, Nollywood’s lead actress has avoided this kind of script.

“When I was very prominent in the film industry, I played all sort of characters,” Nnaji says, seated with her manager in the small but comfy office. “Mum, daughter, deaf, dumb, blind, young, in school, wicked, kind – [I’ve] done it all. Even a mad woman. But how do you make things more interesting?” She pauses, then answers her own question: “It’s really by the twists and turns. People are going to tell the same Romeo and Juliet story but what angle do you tell it from? I think that is what Nollywood needs. We have to be more creative in the way we tell our stories.”

After a good five years in which she was frequently absent from Nollywood screens, the actress has moved into production in order to make the kinds of film she wants to see. Her first film as a producer – in which she also stars opposite Oris Erhuero, with Chioma Omeruah and Majid Michel in supporting roles – was Road to Yesterday. Released in November 2015, it follows a couple as they try to mend their marriage on a road trip to a relative’s funeral. It is a generic story about matrimony, but the film tells it differently and acquires a psychological edge by the denouement. Reactions were mixed, but critics picked out the cinematography – including sweeping drone-shots of Lagos – and an original twist in the plot as worthy of praise, commending Nnaji for daring to break out of the familiar Nollywood formula.

Road To Yesterday was directed by Ishaya Bako, a graduate of the London Film School who acquired some notoriety for his 2012 political documentary Fuelling Poverty, which was banned by the censorship board in Nigeria. Bako belongs to a newer set of filmmakers – mostly young and film-school-educated – who have caused some turbulence in the film industry, fuelling talk of New Nollywood and Old Nollywood. Nnaji says this is meaningless: “People come in, and we should expect to grow younger artists. Every industry should transcend to the next level. There is nothing like New Nollywood or Old Nollywood. There is only continuation.”
Nnaji’s decision to produce her own films comes after a career where she has been both the darling of Nollywood and a pariah.

“I have always been selective,” she says. “The reason it seems like I did more back then is because there were a lot more choices. That seems to have died in the past few years. We are changing the kind of stories we tell when we should be changing the way we tell them.”

It is hard not to see this as criticism of a section of newer filmmakers who have been raised on Hollywood flicks and now seek to recreate them in Nigeria. “I saw quite a lot of stories with James Bond wannabes,” she responds. “They were not authentic to who we are as Nigerians and Africans. I am not buying it, so I doubt [other] people will. And for me it gets to a point when it’s no longer about the money. It’s about craft. I would not be part of a production I don’t believe in my heart.”

PERPLEXED
Recently, eschewing Nollywood was her choice, but back in 2004 the Actors Guild of Nigeria banned her and several of her peers from working, claiming they were asking exorbitant fees. “When a group says ‘You are done for’ and pretty much pulls the rug from under your feet… it was at that point I knew I could survive without the industry for a bit,” she says.

She has made forays into music, a clothing line and product endorsement, earning a reported N20m ($63,000) as the face of Lux. These days she’s into real estate – “that’s my nine to five” – but beneath her graciousness, she seems perplexed by the banning experience. It was a long time ago but it wounded her. Nevertheless, she has now moved on.

Nnaji was a child actor, starring in the popular television soap Ripples, but her middle-class family expected her to study to become a lawyer. She was drawn back into acting when she ran into an old, now famous, friend who was part of Ripples and who recognised her almost a decade after she left the show. He invited her for an audition. “I lied about where I was going,” she says. “I think I did very well because I got the biggest cameor ole.”She laughs a short, self- deprecatory laugh.

Her days of cameos were over shortly after getting that role in Most Wanted, a 1998 Nollywood action flick with female heroines, modelled on the US’s Queen Latifah and Jada Pinkett Smith vehicle Set It Off. Fifteen years later, however, after star- ring in numerous films, Nnaji accepted to play a cameo role again – in the 2013, Biyi Bandele-directed adaptation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novel Half of a Yellow Sun. While the film was in production, reports that British actress Thandie Newton and American Anika Noni Rose would be playing the twin sisters central to the story were met with a negative reaction in Nigeria. A Nigerian ought to play the lead role, Nnaji’s fans said, and who else but the queen of Nigerian cinema, who is Igbo to boot?

Upon release, foreign reviews ranged from harsh to middling while local critics were either forgiving or hostile. The Nigerian actor OC Ukeje complained that a film he had a bigger role in was ignored for his brief showing in Half of a Yellow Sun. Nnaji’s performance was pooh-poohed by the Nigerian public. What did she think of the response?

She sighs, and, for the first time during our talk, appears ruffled. “Yeah, I heard,” she says, subdued. “I took the role in Half of a Yellow Sun for a lot of personal reasons,” she explains. “The Biafra war involved my tribe. Plus, I am an actor: I don’t believe in small roles. It was a big movie, but most importantly I think I owed it to myself, my tribe and my industry to bring the story home. I took on the role and I had no regrets at the time. And I did my best as an actor which is what you do: you accept, you access and you move on. I completely understood people’s reservations. I probably shared the same. But it was a deeper agenda for me.”

NOT A COMPETITION
Part of the disappointment at Nnaji’s casting in Half of a Yellow Sun was that many Nollywood fans credited Nnaji as the one Nollywood star who would make it into Hollywood. Has the actress herself considered Tinseltown?

“Even African-Americans are still struggling to be accepted into the Hollywood circle, so what are the chances that Africans will be welcomed in?” she says. “This is not a competition with Hollywood. I hope that we take from Hollywood the necessary things that we need to be progressive. But it is not the benchmark for me, Genevieve Nnaji. The only place I’ve ever envisioned performing has been Nigeria.

What Nnaji has always wanted is to be is the best in her field, in her industry. “I want to be better than yesterday and I want to improve as the industry improves,” she says. “And the only way we’ll get there is to tell our stories in a quality format. There’s a reason we are successful – we can’t overlook that element that makes us unique. We are enough. We have the numbers. Not just in Nigeria but the whole of Africa.”

She continues: “I have done exactly what I wanted to do, which is perform and act and that is exactly what I will continue to do. Except now I’ve gone behind the scenes, and for me that’s a transition to the next level. There are other productions in the future where I wouldn’t even be in front of the camera. Being behind the scenes of Road to Yesterday was quite an experience, and I am looking forward to it again.”
How soon? “Pretty soon,” she replies.


Oris Aigbokhaevbolo

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Book Review – The Morning Sunset :The Nigerian author warns against migration

Published

on

Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru

 

By Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru

The Morning Sunset is a book written  to sensitize our people over the issue of engaging in a perilous journey to Europe via Libya. It is a story written for everyone: the youths; kids; fathers and mothers. The continuing migration of people into Europe across the Mediterranean is unnecessary. People are not born to waste their future that way.

The Morning Sunset is simply   passing  a message to people in Africa. Those that have not been opportuned to visit western world think that it is a bed of roses. In fact a paradise . Where as it is not like that. Many chose to come in search of greener pastures. They believe that Europe is the only place they will have the opportunity to get a better life for themselves and that of their families.

Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru

My messages to Nigerians and Africans are that our people should not abandon any tangible thing they have or their education just to embark on this long and dangerous journey through road and desert because the life in Europe does not worth such risk . Also let some parents and relatives be aware especially those that are anxiously waiting for the day their beloved children will come back from Europe but they never knew that the bones of their children have been rotten in Sahara deserts and in the seas of foreign land.

 


Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru  is originally from Nigeria but lived in Italy for several years before moving to Leicester , UK.

Continue Reading

Life & Style

President Buhari Congratulates Mama Elumelu At 90

Published

on

President Muhammadu Buhari has congratulated the matriarch of the Elumelu family, Suzanne Elumelu, on her 90th birthday.

President Buhari joined family and friends of the kind-hearted and loving mother of five, including chairman of heirs foundation, Tony Elumelu, in celebrating the milestone, which is an evidence of god’s favour and grace.
The president commended Suzanne Elumelu, who is fondly called mama, for her strength of character and entrepreneurial spirit in raising a strong and healthy family, and her advocacy for good education and investment skills for children and women particularly in the country.
President Buhari believes mama’s life story of succeeding against the odds of early widowhood served as an inspiration to many, while her virtues of the fear of god, discipline, integrity, dedication and hard work will continue to resonate among the communities of the less privileged that she supports and regularly encourages.
The president prays that god will grant mama Elumelu, the Adadioranma of Onicha Ugbo, Delta state, longer life, filled with joy and good health.

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Tekno Delivers the Goods In His New Single ‘Choko’

Published

on

Tekno’s had an active year that’s included the release of his hit “Jogodo,” and its stunning music video, as well as his very recent collaboration with Ciara which just dropped last week.
The Nigerian star is now letting go of yet another single, “Choko,” an addictive new track produced by Krizbeatz, the same man behind Tekno’s massive hit “Pana.”
Read: Ciara Says Tiwa Savage Inspired Her New Tekno-Assisted Single ‘Freak Me’
The syncopated beat work is king here and will keep you coming back for more as Tekno delivers his usual odes to a love interest.
The Nigerian artist’s also launched his own #chokochallenge on Instagram, urging fans to film themselves dancing to the tune. See below for some of those posts.
With these three singles this year—”Jogodo,” “Freak Me” with Ciara and, now, “Choko”—Tekno’s getting on quite a hot streak. Here’s to hoping that continues til the end of the year.
Listen above. “Choko” is available everywhere now.

 

Continue Reading

Life & Style

The Final Issue of Nnedi Okorafor’s Dora Milaje Spin-Off Is Here

Published

on

The author gives the scoop of what to expect in the third installment of “WAKANDA FOREVER” in an interview with Marvel.

The Dora Milaje’s storyline gets even more intense in the third and final installment of WAKANDA FOREVER, penned by Nnedi Okorafor.
For the past two issues, we’ve seen Nakia, former member of the badass, all women army, go on a rampage as the super villain Malice. Okoye, Ayo and Aneka have had to explore the ancient secrets of the Dora to stop her.
In a new Marvel interview, Okorafor talks further about AVENGERS: WAKANDA FOREVER #1, which was illustrated by artist Oleg Okunev, with cover art by Yasmine Putri and the second cover by Venesa Del Rey.
“The Dora Milaje have come to Brooklyn in pursuit of Nakia (AKA Malice) who has stolen a very powerful Wakandan weapon that is also a deep Dora Milaje secret,” Okorafor says to Marvel. “Because we’re in New York, several Super Heroes show up to help (including Storm, T’Challa, Rogue, and Nightcrawler), but only the Dora Milaje truly understand what’s going on—but now the Wakandan weapon that Nakia stole, called a Mimic-27, has gotten free of even Nakia’s control.”

 


Antoinette Isama

Continue Reading

Life & Style

Internationally acclaimed Nigerian author earns VCFA’s 2018 Emerging Writer Scholarship

Published

on

A celebrated African novelist and writer of the hit Nigerian television show “The Calabash” has won the second annual Emerging Writer Scholarship for the MFA in Writing & Publishing program!

Nigerian author Ukamaka Olisakwe will receive the merit-based scholarship—which covers tuition and housing for the program’s two years—when she attends VCFA later this summer.
Olisakwe’s writing credits include more than 100 episodes of “The Calabash” African TV series (DSTV 2015-2016), the novel “Eyes of a Goddess” (Piraeus Books, 2012), and articles and essays in the New York Times and on the BBC.
“My dream of studying creative writing and publishing at the Vermont College of Fine Arts is moving forward, and it is thanks to the generous offer of the Emerging Writer Scholarship. Without the support, writers such as myself would be unable to pursue the dream programs,” Olisakwe said.
The Emerging Writer Scholarship demonstrates VCFA’s commitment to fostering the excellence of emerging and established artists and writers, said Miciah Bay Gault, director of the MFA in Writing & Publishing program.
“What a thrill to welcome Ukamaka to the MFA in Writing & Publishing program. She’s a luminous talent, and she’ll spend the next two years delving into craft, cementing her voice, and learning to navigate the twists and turns of literary life, all in the midst of this tremendously supportive community of friends, faculty, colleagues, and a larger network of writing professionals eager to see her succeed,” said Gault.
Olisakwe was born and raised in Kano, Nigeria. In addition to her writing, Olisakwe has won several awards and fellowships, including a Prince Claus Award, an honorary fellowship in Writing from the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa, and a writing residency from City of Asylum in Pittsburgh, Penn. She was selected in 2014 by the Africa39 Project, in celebration of the UNESCO World Book Capital 2014, as one of the continent’s most promising writers under the age of 40.
Current MFA in Writing & Publishing student Samuel Kolawole, also from Nigeria, received the first Emerging Writer Scholarship last year.

Continue Reading

Book Review : The Morning Sunset By Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru

 

By Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru
The Morning Sunset is a book written to sensitize our people over the issue of engaging in a perilous journey to Europe via Libya. It is a story written for everyone: the youths; kids; fathers and mothers. The continuing migration of people into Europe across the Mediterranean is unnecessary. People are not born to waste their future that way.
The Morning Sunset is simply passing a message to people in Africa. Those that have not been opportuned to visit western world think that it is a bed of roses. In fact a paradise . Where as it is not like that. Many chose to come in search of greener pastures. They believe that Europe is the only place they will have the opportunity to get a better life for themselves and that of their families.

My messages to Nigerians and Africans are that our people should not abandon any tangible thing they have or their education just to embark on this long and dangerous journey through road and desert because the life in Europe does not worth such risk . Also let some parents and relatives be aware especially those that are anxiously waiting for the day their beloved children will come back from Europe but they never knew that the bones of their children have been rotten in Sahara deserts and in the seas of foreign land.

 


Joy Chinwe Aguguo Duru is originally from Nigeria but lived in Italy for several years before moving to Leicester , UK.

Can’t get on ANSSID?
If you have been having challenges getting your Anambra State Social Service number, here is what to do:
• send an email and ANSSID login details to: info@airs.an.gov.ng for immediate assistance.
• Visit the ANSSID HELPDESK or call HELPLINES: 07066727750 or 07033822851

Home24 mins ago

Flood: Obiano Holds Emergency Meeting With Stakeholders, Urges Residents Of Riverine Communities To Relocate

News33 mins ago

Nigeria Floods Leave at Least 100 Dead, Emergency Agency Says

Home47 mins ago

Nigeria Fires Back at HSBC After Bank Criticizes President

Home1 day ago

NIGERIAN AIR FORCE COMMENCES REHEARSALS FOR AERIAL DISPLAY IN ABUJA

Home1 day ago

Why Nigeria is a burgeoning market for UK legal services

Job Centre1 day ago

Linda Ikeji gives birth to baby boy

Home1 day ago

I will not resign as senate president, Saraki insists

Home1 day ago

Son of president of Court of Appeal joins Gombe governorship race

Politics1 day ago

Diaspora PDP chieftain joins APGA

Home2 days ago

2019 and APGA’s new game plan

Home2 days ago

Press Release : News of missing Girls Unfounded – Anambra State College of Education , Umunze .

Home2 days ago

Buhari Mourns On Nigeria’s Ambassador To Qatar

Home2 days ago

PDP Demands Adeosun’s Arrest, Prosecution

Life & Style2 days ago

Forget Milan. African Fashion Is Taking Over the World.

Politics2 days ago

For Chido Obidiegwu, Egbokide Nke Ino Na Okija, A Testimonial

Home3 days ago

Africa Day Celebration in the Diaspora:Funny scene as Irish police dances with Africa Day attendees

Special Report/Investigation3 days ago

WHY CORRUPTION IS FIGHTING IN NIGERIA

Business3 days ago

SETTING STANDARDS FOR YOUR SMALL BUSINESS

Politics3 days ago

Taraba APC factions clash as court restrains newly sworn-in State Chairman from entering office

Home3 days ago

TEXT: NAF DESTROYS BOKO HARAM VEHICLES ALONG GUDUMBALI-TUMBUN REGO AXIS, NEUTRALIZES INSURGENTS’ LOGISTICS BASE

Home2 weeks ago

Four Anambra Girls Selected For 2018 UK Chevening Scholarship .

Education3 weeks ago

In Brief – Anambra Again : Good news from Adazi Nnukwu

Special Report/Investigation4 days ago

Corpse stolen from mortuary and held for £10,000 ransom, say Nigerian police

Home2 weeks ago

Obiano In China As Part Of The Presidential Delegation

Photos/Videos3 weeks ago

Peter Obi’s Vice Presidential Ambitions By Martin Ugochukwu

Home1 week ago

Obiano gives scholarship to student who invented bitter-leaf processor

Home4 weeks ago

Honest Nigerian guard ‘mocked’ for returning cash

Home4 days ago

This is It : Kemi Adeosun’s Letter Of Resignation

Home3 weeks ago

Bukola Saraki’s Declaration for 2019 Presidential Race – Full Speech

Foreign4 weeks ago

Melania Trump to visit Africa

Home3 days ago

Africa Day Celebration in the Diaspora:Funny scene as Irish police dances with Africa Day attendees

Home3 weeks ago

Chief of Staff to President Buhari, Abba Kyari Speaks

Photos/Videos2 weeks ago

PhotoNews : Highlights of Celebration of Iri Ji Festival by the Igbo Community in Liverpool,UK.

Home3 weeks ago

Obiano Offers Scholarship, N1m to Anambra’s Golden Girls

Home4 weeks ago

Buhari Gives Reasons To Trek In Daura

Home3 days ago

Gov. Ishaku’s commissioner resigns, dumps PDP for APGA in Taraba

Home4 weeks ago

Video /PhotoNews : Igbo Community Coventry UK Iri Ji Festival , Saturday

News4 weeks ago

AGULERI HOLDS HER FIRST EVER GENERAL FASTING/PRAYERS AND THANKSGIVING

Life & Style2 weeks ago

Book Review – The Morning Sunset :The Nigerian author warns against migration

Home2 weeks ago

VIDEO: Edwin Clark Threatens Legal Action Over Home Raid

Advertisement
August 2018
S M T W T F S
« Jul   Sep »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Trending