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‘It’s Time to Decolonize Environmentalism’: An Interview with Zina Saro-Wiwa

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By Ismail Einashe

With a forthcoming solo show at Tiwani Contemporary, London, the artist discusses Niger-Delta food traditions, ‘disaster narratives’ and environmental challenges.

The final words of Zina Saro-Wiwa’s father before he was hanged by a Nigerian military government in 1995 were, ‘Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues.’ His death sent shockwaves around the world. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a writer and a human rights activist who fought against the degradation and exploitation of his native Ogoniland in Nigeria by multinational oil companies. He became an enduring symbol of environmental activism owing to his efforts to bring to attention the struggles of the Niger Delta’s more than 30 million inhabitants. Today, his daughter, based in New York, uses her art to explore the identity of this enigmatic region – one not premised on tragedy and devastation, but rather an openness and optimism. Saro-Wiwa’s bold work incorporates video, photography, sculpture and installation. Since 2014, she also runs the art space Boys’ Quarters Project Space in her father’s old offices in Port Hartcourt, Nigeria.

‘The Turquoise Meat Inside’ at Tiwani Contemporary, London, marks Saro-Wiwa’s first solo exhibition in Europe following two solo museum shows in the US in 2015 and 2016 at the Krannert Art Museum, Champaign and Blaffer Art Museum, Houston.

Ismail Einashe – You’ve worked as a journalist and a documentary filmmaker. Can you tell me about your decision to begin making visual art?

Zina Saro-Wiwa- I didn’t move into art consciously. It proved to be the only strategy that allowed me to deal with what had happened to me and my family and Nigeria. For 10 years after my father’s execution, I hadn’t really mourned him and chose to cut myself off from anything that surrounded his legacy, as there seemed to be no real space for me within it. He became an international symbol, rather than my father. When I was ready to deal with it I thought that making a documentary about him would be the way for me to reclaim some of his memory and to forge a connection with Nigeria. But every time I went to a pitching meeting at a production company I would break down sobbing. I eventually made a video that dealt directly with my inability to mourn my father’s death: Sarogua Morning (2011). It was a video performance where I shaved my head and forced myself to cry and mourn in front of the camera. That was the film I needed to make. Not a documentary. This work gave me agency, resilience. It made me research mourning cultures around the world and in Ogoniland. It made me think about the relationship between performance and catharsis; it commented on the gap between the public and private sphere when it came to mourning his death. It was also painful and very hard work. But I could reframe history and emotion and connect them any way I wanted to through this device. Art was and is a gift.

IE- Unsurprisingly, your name is often intertwined with your father’s. Can you describe the impact and legacy of his work on your own and compare your approach to his?

ZSW- My father was a writer of plays, TV shows, poems, short stories, essays, articles, novels. His topic was always ultimately the Nigerian condition, and he had a huge amount of love for the country despite his criticism of it. The direct activism came later; I don’t know what specifically tipped him into such direct advocacy. But the outrages in the region were egregious. Activism was not a job for him; it was something he couldn’t help but engage in. I have a more complex relationship with activism: I do not consider myself an activist and never will. I hope nothing happens to me that forces me to engage on a single issue. I find myself in a position where I am interested in what is happening in the Niger Delta but I want to use art to engage with broadening concepts of environmentalism. I want art to be used to excavate history and imagine futures. There is no future in an identity built on degradation. So I intend to remain expansive in the space of the Niger Delta and to connect whatever happens there with the rest of the world.

IE –  You say the Niger Delta has a ‘latent indigenous environmentalism’, which has been ignored by international onlookers and local communities. Can you explain what you mean by that?

ZSW – From my perspective, it seems as if the idea of ‘big E’ Environmentalism is shaped by a certain group of thinkers in the West. It is currently framed predominantly through the issue of carbon emissions, at least on an international level. Of course, there is also the issue of rising sea levels and climate change, all desperately important and overlapping issues; but Environmentalism is a broad church. The concerns of big environmental groups don’t necessarily speak to and for others in other parts of the world. When my father was killed, environmental groups used this as an opportunity to argue against Big Oil, which was directly implicated in his death. Oil is certainly part of our environmental puzzle in the Niger Delta but there is much more to consider. Another reason indigenous environmentalism is overshadowed I think is because of Pentecostal religion, which has altered Africa’s relationship with the natural world and dampened this connection. Animism, for all its faults as a belief system, described and forged strong relationships between humans and the natural world. For me a Niger Delta environmentalism has to implicate invisible ecosystems, such as spiritual and religious beliefs. We also have to face our own capitalistic desires and manage them. Niger Deltans aren’t anti-capitalist wood nymphs. For want of a better phrase, it’s time to decolonize Environmentalism, democratize the conversation and create a more nuanced approach to environmental challenges.

IE – You’re challenging ‘disaster narratives’ about Ogoniland. How have these narratives impacted the Ogoni people?

ZSW I think terrible things have happened to Ogoni people and other peoples in the Niger Delta. In fact, all over Africa we see instances of exploitation both internal and international. I think it’s important to understand what has happened, but I also see it as necessary to define yourself independently of loss and violence. It is not a healthy basis on which to build an identity. Violent oil extraction is a tragedy but not an identity. It is time to turn inward and think more deeply and honestly about our relationship with our environment. I think regions are strong when they maintain strong cultural ties to their past and thus a powerful sense of self. Cultural power leads to other forms of power. So for me culture comes first, and contemporary art is a tool and strategy to uncover the past and develop cultural capital.

IE- Can you tell me more about what the title of your forthcoming exhibition at Tiwani Contemporary, ‘The Turquoise Meat Inside’, refers to?

ZSM- ‘The Turquoise Meat Inside’ is the title of this show but also a poem, a sculpture, a tag, a mantra, a seduction. It refers to a sea snail indigenous to the Niger Delta, that has a hard, dark brown outer shell and turquoise flesh. The shells, called periwinkles, are sometimes used as building materials, and are sacred to some Niger Delta ethnic groups; they are also eaten in soups and stews.

IE- In your food interventions, like the 2012 New West African Kitchen project, you curated and cooked a West African feast for guests. In 2015, you mounted a ‘feast performance’ for 50 guests. In your film Phyllis (2010), the character eats garri (West African food made from cassava tubers) and egusi (another Nigerian staple) while watching Nollywood films. Can you talk more about the role of food and its consumption in your work?

ZSW- I’m glad you picked up on the food in Phyllis. That was one of my first ever artworks, and I think it’s interesting that food found its way into my work that early. When I was younger I saw a solemnity and sadness in consuming food. I loved food and we thoroughly enjoyed our meals as children, but watching someone eat made me feel a kind of pity. I don’t fully understand why. I think explaining can kill feeling, and the art work is a part of the explanation, a part of the puzzle. But I will say that food has proven a vehicle that delivers immediacy and complexity in whatever format I incorporate it, from a banquet to an eating video or a written recipe. Every time I relegate it to the periphery of my practice or forget to put it on my biography, it somehow works its way back in.

IE- In recent years, you’ve focused on Ogoni masquerade culture. Why did this interest come about and can you explain its significance in your various works?

ZSW In 2013, I was commissioned by Seattle Art Museum to create a work about masquerade, and it coincided with my move back to Nigeria. I arrived in Nigeria not knowing what exactly I was going to achieve, but having this mandate to produce work that responded to masquerade was fantastic. It was a reason to visit multiple villages all over Ogoniland (there are 111 in total) and to have them open up to me in ways that they would not have done normally. Observing masquerade creates that chaos inside me in the same way that Nollywood films do. I’ve been making work to respond to this internal chaos, to try to explain masquerade to myself. Masquerade is another tool to allow me to understand who Ogoni people are beyond being victims of industrial violence. Masquerade is both ostentatious and mysterious and contains a lot of hidden meaning. Petroleum geologists have a particular understanding of this region, and I think it is important that a cultural cartography exists as well, to expand the identity of this region as more than a site ripe for exploitation.

Zina Saro-Wiwa, ‘The Turquoise Meat Inside’, runs at Tiwani Contemporary, London, from 13 September – 27 October 2018.


Zina Saro-Wiwa
– Nigerian activist Ken Saro-Wiwa was killed by the state in 1995 after protesting oil extraction in Ogoniland, his home region. Now his daughter, Zina, uses art to demonstrate how environmental destruction has informed Ogoni “emotional, social, and spiritual ecosystems.” She spent two years documenting the tribe’s rituals and aesthetics, culminating in her first solo exhibition, which ran through March in Houston. It included a video installation of Ogoni dancing around pipelines—the lively and powerful contrasted with the inorganic and inert—and the first-ever photographs of the Ogele, secretive performance groups that emerged in the 1980s wearing masks that celebrated opposition to the oil industry. Saro-Wiwa’s art, the Village Voice said, showcases “the gesture of masking, in all its eerie strength.” (Photo courtesy of Zina Saro-Wiwa)

Notable Facts:
Born in Ogoni­land, Saro-Wiwa grew up in the United Kingdom. She used to work for the BBC as a presenter on The Culture Show.
The title of her exhibition is Did You Know We Taught Them How to Dance?—a reference to a private conversation she had with her father; the phrase alludes to the idea of self-determination.

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Barack Obama shares sweet birthday message for Michelle

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The former US first lady celebrated her 55th birthday yesterday.

THROWBACK: Barack and Michelle Obama (Image: Barack Obama/Instagram)

BARACK OBAMA has shared a sweet and touching message for his wife Michelle to celebrate her birthday.
Michelle, who turned 55 years old yesterday, has captured the world’s heart again with the release of her memoir Becoming, which was released at the end of last year, and her candid and empowering international book tour.
In a social media post shared across his Instagram and Twitter accounts, Obama shared a throwback picture of himself with his arm around Michelle.
He captioned the image: “I knew it way back then and I’m absolutely convinced of it today – you’re one of a kind, Michelle Obama. Happy Birthday!”
Michelle responded to the tweet sharing her appreciation for the birthday messages she received.

She wrote: “Thank you all so much for the birthday love—I love you all right back! Feeling so incredibly thankful for my South Side roots, my soul-affirming partner and daughters, and every unimaginable twist and turn over these 55 years. Can’t wait to see what becomes of the next one!”
The pair marked their 26th wedding anniversary last year.
Aside from her birthday, the former first lady has another reason to celebrate. Her book, Becoming, which has been a global hit, has topped the Amazon best seller list for 47 days, making it the book that’s held the top spot the longest since Fifty Shades of Grey back in 2012.
Becoming has sold more copies than any other book released in the United States last year.
Due to the overwhelming interest in Michelle’s book tour, she has extended it, adding extra dates including an event at the O2 in London this April.

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Life & Style

MOSES AND THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

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A worldwide success is coming to mytv on Tuesday 29th January at 9pm

THE STORY OF THE MAN THAT CHANGED THE DESTINY OF HIS PEOPLE

This incredibly successful soap opera tells the epic saga of Moses, from his birth to the arrival of the Hebrews to the Promised Land, including the escape from Egypt trough the Red Sea and his encounter with God on Mount Sinai.
Filmed partially on location in Israel, Egypt, and in the Atacama Desert in Chile, authenticity in film sets, scenery, costumes and historical accounts, and a deep respect for the Bible are paramount. A big production filled with amazing special effects unfolds more than a century of History.
You can watch this amazing story on mytv (Sky 191)

mytv is broadcasting in the whole United Kingdom (SKY 191 or thru ASTRA 2G 28.2º E), it’s becoming a great choice for TV viewers due to it’s diversified daily content.

Supported by a great selection of programmes, that goes from World News to Music, Inspirational, Soap Operas, Miniseries, Reality TV and Sports, mytv is relevant to a wide range of audience!

mytv.co.uk
facebook.com/mytv.co.uk
twitter.com/mytvuk
e-mail: contact@mytv.co.uk

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Life & Style

Genevieve Nnaji marks 20 years in Nollywood

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Veteran Nollywood actress and film maker, Genevieve Nnaji, celebrated two decades in the film sector with a reflective New Year post.
Reports had it that Nnaji shared an appreciative message to her fans, which doubled as her New Year message. This, she did through her Twitter handle @GenevieveNnaji1.
Sharing a picture of ‘Lion Heart’s script, she wrote, “As 2018 comes to an end, I mark 20 years in the art of film making. I am grateful for my life, journey, and growth thus far.’’
“I am happy I could celebrate with you through a product that embodied all of me mentally and spiritually, for all of your pleasure. I love you guys! Happy New Year,” Nnaji said.

Awards
Nnaji, who recently premiered her directorial debut, ‘Lion Heart’, began acting at the age of 19 in 1998 with the movie, ‘Most Wanted’.
The 39-year-old won the Africa Movie Academy Award (AMAA) for Best Actress in a Leading Role in 2005, making her the first actress to win the award.
Nnaji was one of the best paid actresses in Nollywood in 2009, and was the first actress to be awarded Best Actress at the 2001 City Peoples Awards.
She was also the first actress to bag the Best Actress award, by the Censors Board of Nigeria in 2003. In 2009, she was referred to as the Julia Roberts of Africa by Oprah Winfrey
In 2011, she was honoured with the Member of the Order of the Federal Republic award by the Federal Government for her contributions to Nollywood.
In 2015, Nnaji produced her first movie, ‘Road to Yesterday’, which won Best Movie Overall-West Africa at the 2016 Africa Magic Viewers’ Choice Awards (AMVCA).
On Sept. 7, 2018, her directorial debut, ‘Lion Heart’, was acquired by online streaming service, Netflix; making it the first Netflix original film from Nigeria.

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Life & Style

Ezinihitte Celebrates Oji Mbaise Festival

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It was a celebration of culture at Ezinihitte Mbaise local government council, Imo state, southeast Nigeria as the people gathered to celebrate their yearly Oji Mbaise festival.

The event drew dignitaries from far and near, amongst whom was the vice presidential candidate of the peoples democratic party, peter obi.
The event was indeed a home coming for sons and daughters of Ife Ezinihitte.

The Oji Ezinihitte cultural festival is celebrated on the first day of january every year as a symbol of togetherness in the community
The vice presidential candidate of the peoples democratic party, peter obi and others spoke on the uniqueness of the culture.
The people of Ezinihitte Mbaise are known for celebrating the Kolanut festival since 1937, which they believe is the king of all cultures.

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Life & Style

Diversity to play a large role in Marvel’s future

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Marvel president Kevin Feige spoke on the future of Marvel Studios in a recent podcastFOLLOWING THE success of Black Panther, Hollywood has seen the true impact of diversity and the benefits of inclusivity in cinema – and Marvel have announced plans to double up on representation for future movies.
In a recent podcast, Kevin Feige, president of Marvel Studios, revealed that diversity will play a big role in its’ future in front of and behind the cameras.
On Variety’s ‘Playback’ podcast, Feige said: “[Black Panther] is the beginning. That worked out as well [and] has encouraged us to head in the direction we were going to head in anyway. But you look at that film, it is incredible. That movie would not have been what it was if everyone sitting at the table looked like you or me. And that is true for all the movies.”
Black Panther smashed box office records worldwide and became the highest-rated Marvel movie, according to Rotten Tomatoes.

“As Marvel Studios has grown, it is the same thing, almost half-man and half-woman. That may become more women in the coming years based on the newest team members who continue to grow. We try to grow and promote in house,” said the Marvel boss.
Feige added that “when you have diverse voices, you get better stories and you get more exciting stories, you get more surprising stories. And that is something that is very clear.”
In March, Captain Marvel will be the first MCU’s female-led film co-directed by female director Anna Boden. The studio plans to expand and fulfil their diversity agenda, by including a Black Widow solo film set to be directed by Cate Shortland and they’re also reportedly developing a Shang-Chi film.

 

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Life & Style

“Bible Of Fashion” WWD Names Jackie Aina “Influencer Of The Year”

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Women’s Wear Daily (WWD) also known as “the bible of fashion” has named Nigerian American Jackie Aina, Influencer of the Year for 2018.


Jackie Aina is a beauty YouTuber told Entrepreneur that she “kept getting told at makeup counters that the trends she wanted to try wouldn’t work for her complexion”.


This inspired her to her start posting videos of make-up videos showing people how to use products and called on beauty companies to be all-inclusive.
Because of this, companies started to make products that appealed to women of colour.

Since then, she has partnered with MAC Cosmetics, e.l.f. Cosmetics, Too Faced, Sephora and Sigma Beauty and Artist Couture.
Aina revealed to Bustle in 2018 that she would create a cosmetics line by 2019.
Also in 2018, she was awarded the “YouTuber of the Year” at the 49th NAACP Image Awards.
Watch one of Aina’s tutorial below:

 

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Life & Style

Winning Thursday with Omotola (@omohtee12 ): The Young Netpreneur for the Week

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The #Netpreneur Pick for the Week is Omotola (@omohtee12 ),CEO & Founder, Toj Fabrics.

@omohtee12 sells affordable and classy men fabrics!.

Please checkout Toj_fabrics on instagram for more pictures/details and enquires.

 

 

 

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Life & Style

Video: Cynthia Erivo apologies for messing up US national anthem

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The Grammy and Tony Award-winning musician said she was “nervous and tired” after performing Star Spangled Banner at a basketball game.

BRITISH-NIGERIAN actress Cynthia Erivo has apologised for forgetting the words to the US national anthem at a basketball game.
The Widows star was asked to perform Star Spangled Banner at the Nets vs. Lakers game in New York on Tuesday night, but the 31-year-old stumbled over the words as she struggled to remember the lyrics. She then stopped singing altogether to regain her composure, before starting over and singing the song again.

Erivo apologised for the mishap, telling fans she was “nervous and tired”.
She tweeted: “Some people have quiet mess ups, some people mess in front of the world. I’m human and I mess up in the same way as everyone else, so if you were watching tonight, I’m sorry, I was nervous and tired. I strive for perfection, so right now no one can beat me up more than myself.”

Erivo’s performance was defended online by fans, with one user writing: “You sounded brilliant! Words are words— 90% of Americans get the words wrong to that anthem. Your gorgeous voice was all I heard. Your view of failure is what everyone’s view of perfection is. Beautiful as always.”
2019 is shaping up to be a big year for Erivo, as she recently announced plans to release an album with music label Verve Record and will star in a Harriet Tubman biopic which is set to begin production next fall.

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Life & Style

President Buhari congratulates oil magnet, Ikpea at 62

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President Muhammadu Buhari has felicitated with a major investor in the oil and gas industry, Dr Leemon Ikpea, as he turns 62 on December 19, 2018.
The President appreciates the grace of God, which brought Chief Ikpea from humble beginnings to the topmost rungs of the business ladder and describes him as classic example of what God can do in shaping the fortunes of human beings who trust in Him.
President Buhari rejoices with family, friends and business associates of the celebrant, noting that Lee Engineering and Construction Company, of which Chief Ikpea is Chairman/Chief Executive Officer, is one of the home-grown investors in the oil and gas industry, through dint of hard work.
The President salutes the philanthropy of Chief Ikpea, which has seen him awarding numerous scholarships and bequests, to uplift the weak and downtrodden.
The Itsekiri, Delta State born chief, President Buhari prays, will continue to serve God and humanity, in good health and be endued with long life and prosperity.

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Life & Style

Ugandan crowned 2018 Miss World Africa

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Miss Uganda, Quiin Abenakyo was crowned Miss World Africa at the Miss World 2018 finals in Sanya city, China.
The world’s oldest running international beauty pageant, Miss World brings together beauty queens from all over the world.

By Saturday morning, Abenakyo had made the top 12 finalists in the competition. The other competitors were from Belarus, France, Scotland, Jamaica, Martinique, Mexico, Panama, Mauritius, Nepal, New Zealand and Thailand.
Born in eastern Uganda, the 22 year old is a graduate of business computing. She is the first Ugandan to win the Miss World Africa crown.

During the 2018 Miss Uganda competition, Abenakyo beat 21 other contestants to win the crown.
In the days leading to the final vote, Ugandans had been mobilising over social media to build support for Abenakyo.

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Chief Chinedu Obidigwe ( Akaoma Jide Aku) The Federal House of Representatives Candidate of APGA Anambra East and West federal constituency

Winning Tuesday with Aesthetic doctor, Ifeoma Ejikeme at the Adonia Medical Clinic. : The Young Netpreneur for the Week.

New year, new skin regime
Advice and recommendations to help make your beauty resolutions a reality.If you struggle with your skin or just fancy a shakeup of your current beauty regime, then you’ve come to the right place.

Contact the wonderful aesthetic doctor, Ifeoma Ejikeme at the Adonia Medical Clinic using the below details :

Dr Ifeoma Ejikeme -Adonia Medical Clinic
General Medicine Consultant, Aesthetic Medicine Physician and Lecturer at Queen Mary’s University.London, England.

PROFESSIONAL: Dr Ejikeme doing an Obaji chemical peel

Jawline-Botox-Lips-Pigmentation-Dermal Filler-Skinfood etc

AdoniaMedicalClinic.com

Contact: 020 3858 0268

Twitter @DrEjikeme

Instagram@dr_ifeoma_ejikeme

 

 

 

 

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